DOE Standard 90.1–2010 Said to Provide 18% Energy Savings for Commerical Buildings vs. 2007 Standard


DOE has determined that the quantitative analysis of the energy consumption of buildings built to Standard 90.1–2010,as compared with buildings built to Standard 90.1–2007, indicates national source energy savings of approximately 18.2 percent of commercial building energy consumption. Additionally, DOE has determined site energy savings are estimated to be approximately 18.5 percent.

States are required to certify that they have reviewed the provisions of their commercial building code regarding energy efficiency, and as necessary, updated their code to meet or exceed Standard 90.1–2010.

Certification statements by the States must be provided by October 18, 2013.

Standard_901-2010_Final_Determination

DOE Energy Standard

DOE lists the States that have filed certifications and those that have or have not adopted new codes on the DOE Energy Efficiency and Renewable
Energy Web site at http://www.energycodes.gov/states/. Once a
State has adopted a new commercial code, DOE typically provides software,
training, and support for the new code as long as the new code is based on the national model codes (in this case, ASHRAE Standard 90.1).
Some States develop their own codes that are only loosely related to the
national model codes and DOE does not typically provide technical support for those codes. However, DOE does provide grants to these States through
grant programs administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). DOE does not prescribe how each State adopts and enforces its energy codes.

(1) Large amounts of fuel and energy are consumed unnecessarily each year
in heating, cooling, ventilating, and providing domestic hot water for newly
constructed residential and commercial buildings because such buildings lack adequate energy conservation features;
(2) Federal voluntary performance standards for newly constructed buildings can prevent such waste of energy, which the Nation can no longer
afford in view of its current and anticipated energy shortage;
(3) the failure to provide adequate energy conservation measures in newly
constructed buildings increases longterm operating costs that may affect
adversely the repayment of, and security for, loans made, insured, or guaranteed by Federal agencies or made by federally insured or regulated
instrumentalities; and

(4) State and local building codes or similar controls can provide an existing
means by which to assure, in coordination with other building
requirements and with a minimum of Federal interference in State and local
transactions, that newly constructed buildings contain adequate energy
conservation features. (42 U.S.C. 6831)

 

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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
Michael Erbesfeld, U.S. Department of
Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and
Renewable Energy, Forrestal Building,
Mail Station EE–2J, 1000 Independence
Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20585–
0121, (202) 287–1874, e-mail:
michael.erbesfeld@ee.doe.gov.

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