Comprehensive Facility Maintenance Plan


Comprehensive Facility Maintenance Plan / CFMP

job order contracting

The cornerstone of any CFMP should be preventive maintenance.  A regularly-scheduled preventive maintenance,  mitigates the frequency of unplanned failures, extends the longevity of building systems beyond industry standards, and best suits organization needs for a safe and functional physical environment.

Commons CFMP objectives include:

  1. Maintenance of the physical environment in support of the organization’s  mission
  2. Extending the lifespan of building systems
  3. Maintaining the asset value of the property
  4. Mitigating catastrophic building system failures, fires, accidents, and other safety hazards.
  5. Providing buildings that function at requisite efficiency
  6. Providing continuous use of facilities without disruptions
  7. Energy conservation
  8. Regulatory compliance

Staffing,  delivery methodology,  standardized and timely information, and supporting technology are core aspects in the execution of;

  1. Scheduled Maintenance – Description of activities that can be forecast and for which expenditures of parts and labor are based on a predictable time table or use schedule. Main components include: Preventive Maintenance, Modifications and Alterations, and Scheduled Replacement.
  2. Unscheduled Maintenance – Description of activities that cannot be programmed or forecast, including emergency repairs and corrections of breakdowns.
  3. Deferred Maintenance – Description of scheduled activities, delayed or postponed for reasons such as lack of funds or personnel, changes in priorities and change of use.

Staffing

Operations and maintenance departments, based upon size, may have multiple departments, each with an area of specialization, or a single department.  Examples of specialized areas include: 1. Environmental, Health, and Safety, 2. Central Maintenance Shops, 3. Cluster Maintenance Program, 4. Custodial Services, and 5. Energy and Recycling.

Tasks

Ongoing tasks associated with operations and maintenance departments vary widely, and may include:

  • Preventive maintenance program execution for all facilities
  • Work order service requests management
  • Regular inspections of equipment and building systems, such as roofs, boilers, chillers, sprinkler systems, fire alarms, elevators, fire extinguishers…
  • Repair services
  • Maintain regulatory compliance for select building systems (e.g., elevators, fire suppression systems, pressure vessels)
  • Computerized maintenance management system software operation.
  • Administration of renovation, repair, and maintenance contracts
  • General –  grounds maintenance program, custodial, etc.
  • Utility-billing data collection and analysis (including electric, natural gas, heating oil, propone, water/sewer, solid waste, and recycling).
  • Procurement of energy and solid waste services.
  • Manage contracts associated with energy and solid waste services.
  • Monitor the energy market to direct procurement decisions.
  • Coordinate with State and local officials on issues associated with energy, water/sewer utilities, and solid waste management.
  • Development and oversee energy reduction programs
  • Manage resource reduction and recycling program
  • Direct capital improvement projects related to lighting retrofits and solar power
  • Provide energy audits

Key Performance Indicators

The typical key performance indicators may include the following:

  • Top ten work order trouble codes
  • Quantity of temperature complaints (“too hot”, “too cold”)
  • Workforce productivity and utilization
  • Preventive maintenance versus corrective (or “reactive”) maintenance
  • Preventive maintenance schedule completion rate
  • Percent of major building systems operating within industry standard lifespan
  • System life-cycle performance
  • Deferred maintenance backlog reduction

Execution

Best value procurement, LEAN collaborative construction delivery methods such as Job Order Contracting, standard terms, definitions, as well as standardized cost and data architectures, and a documented Operations & Maintenance Execution Guide all contribute to maximizing return-on-investment and improving outcomes.

System Life-spans

  • Boilers (Steel, fire-tube) 25 years
  • Boilers (Cast iron) 35 years
  • Chillers (Air-cooled, reciprocating compressor) 20 years
  • Chillers (Water-cooled, screw compressor) 25 years
  • Chillers (Water-cooled, centrifugal compressor) 28 years •
  • HVAC (Rooftop units) 20 years
  • HVAC (Room unit ventilators) 25 years
  • HVAC (Penthouse/Interior mounted air handlers) 40 years
  • Flooring (Carpet) 15 years
  • Roofs (Asphalt Built-Up Roof, sloped) 25 years
  • Roofs (Metal) 30 years
  • Paving 25 years

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