Multi-Site Facility Renovation, Repair, Maintenance, & Sustainability

Facilities operations involving multiple sites and building types/ages can be efficiently managed with the right mix of global oversight and local execution as well as consistent application of LEAN best management practices.

strategic facility management and BIM

Visibility and communication at global and local levels is critical, including the ability to track the  work order status and cost from concept thru warranty period.

Ad hoc, pen-and-paper based, systems must be replaced with appropriate technology that can provide a permanent record of core activities.

Procurement must be based upon BEST VALUE,  and also used standardized terms, definitions and data sets, and rely upon the support of internal and external teams, as well be integrated with collaborative construction delivery methods such as Job Order Contracting, JOC.

Automated work order system and electronic cost estimating and project management capability  provide  visibility and control of facilities maintenance and repair processes.

True collaboration and longer term relationships with contractors and subcontractors, where both parties share common goals, risk/reward, and mutual respect is equally important.

Work orders should be request and managed locally with appropriate global oversight, including regular audits.  “Trust but measure” is a core component of LEAN, as are continuous improvement, and key performance indicators, KPIs.

Robust LEAN construction delivery processes must be implemented consistently throughout the organization, while also taking into account local requirements and conditions.

Any effort or resource expended should be Outcome-based.  The goals is to improve the ability to track progress and to accelerate the time-to-resolution of prioritized open work orders, in order to maximize limited resources.

Value-based selection of contractors and longer term relationships provide local knowledge of building and service requirements, on-demand quality service, and maximized efficiency.  Operational efficiency is improved, while costs are reduced due to the reduction of change orders, improved quality, and a higher percentage of projects delivered on-time and on-budget.

Key performance indicators, KPI’s provide metrics that to hold both Owners and service providers more accountable with quantitative, current, and actionable information.

Owners and oversight groups must provide leadership and be capable of understanding the processes and value of collaborative construction delivery and associated life-cycle facility management methodology.  Without this leadership, Owners don’t stand a chance of efficiently managing their real property portfolios.

job order contracting

Alternative LEAN construction delivery provides significantly higher  visibility into overall maintenance and repair spending.    Properly implement project delivery timelines can be reduced from years to months, or from months to weeks.   Significant reductions in costs can also be achieved, in the range of 15% to 50%.

Comprehensive Facility Maintenance Plan

Comprehensive Facility Maintenance Plan / CFMP

job order contracting

The cornerstone of any CFMP should be preventive maintenance.  A regularly-scheduled preventive maintenance,  mitigates the frequency of unplanned failures, extends the longevity of building systems beyond industry standards, and best suits organization needs for a safe and functional physical environment.

Commons CFMP objectives include:

  1. Maintenance of the physical environment in support of the organization’s  mission
  2. Extending the lifespan of building systems
  3. Maintaining the asset value of the property
  4. Mitigating catastrophic building system failures, fires, accidents, and other safety hazards.
  5. Providing buildings that function at requisite efficiency
  6. Providing continuous use of facilities without disruptions
  7. Energy conservation
  8. Regulatory compliance

Staffing,  delivery methodology,  standardized and timely information, and supporting technology are core aspects in the execution of;

  1. Scheduled Maintenance – Description of activities that can be forecast and for which expenditures of parts and labor are based on a predictable time table or use schedule. Main components include: Preventive Maintenance, Modifications and Alterations, and Scheduled Replacement.
  2. Unscheduled Maintenance – Description of activities that cannot be programmed or forecast, including emergency repairs and corrections of breakdowns.
  3. Deferred Maintenance – Description of scheduled activities, delayed or postponed for reasons such as lack of funds or personnel, changes in priorities and change of use.

Staffing

Operations and maintenance departments, based upon size, may have multiple departments, each with an area of specialization, or a single department.  Examples of specialized areas include: 1. Environmental, Health, and Safety, 2. Central Maintenance Shops, 3. Cluster Maintenance Program, 4. Custodial Services, and 5. Energy and Recycling.

Tasks

Ongoing tasks associated with operations and maintenance departments vary widely, and may include:

  • Preventive maintenance program execution for all facilities
  • Work order service requests management
  • Regular inspections of equipment and building systems, such as roofs, boilers, chillers, sprinkler systems, fire alarms, elevators, fire extinguishers…
  • Repair services
  • Maintain regulatory compliance for select building systems (e.g., elevators, fire suppression systems, pressure vessels)
  • Computerized maintenance management system software operation.
  • Administration of renovation, repair, and maintenance contracts
  • General –  grounds maintenance program, custodial, etc.
  • Utility-billing data collection and analysis (including electric, natural gas, heating oil, propone, water/sewer, solid waste, and recycling).
  • Procurement of energy and solid waste services.
  • Manage contracts associated with energy and solid waste services.
  • Monitor the energy market to direct procurement decisions.
  • Coordinate with State and local officials on issues associated with energy, water/sewer utilities, and solid waste management.
  • Development and oversee energy reduction programs
  • Manage resource reduction and recycling program
  • Direct capital improvement projects related to lighting retrofits and solar power
  • Provide energy audits

Key Performance Indicators

The typical key performance indicators may include the following:

  • Top ten work order trouble codes
  • Quantity of temperature complaints (“too hot”, “too cold”)
  • Workforce productivity and utilization
  • Preventive maintenance versus corrective (or “reactive”) maintenance
  • Preventive maintenance schedule completion rate
  • Percent of major building systems operating within industry standard lifespan
  • System life-cycle performance
  • Deferred maintenance backlog reduction

Execution

Best value procurement, LEAN collaborative construction delivery methods such as Job Order Contracting, standard terms, definitions, as well as standardized cost and data architectures, and a documented Operations & Maintenance Execution Guide all contribute to maximizing return-on-investment and improving outcomes.

System Life-spans

  • Boilers (Steel, fire-tube) 25 years
  • Boilers (Cast iron) 35 years
  • Chillers (Air-cooled, reciprocating compressor) 20 years
  • Chillers (Water-cooled, screw compressor) 25 years
  • Chillers (Water-cooled, centrifugal compressor) 28 years •
  • HVAC (Rooftop units) 20 years
  • HVAC (Room unit ventilators) 25 years
  • HVAC (Penthouse/Interior mounted air handlers) 40 years
  • Flooring (Carpet) 15 years
  • Roofs (Asphalt Built-Up Roof, sloped) 25 years
  • Roofs (Metal) 30 years
  • Paving 25 years

LEAN Facility Renovation, Repair, & Construction

Collaboration Matrix

Owner focus upon a BEST VALUE approach to facility management is required in order to maximize productivity and minimize waster.   Prevalent “low bid” design-bid-build construction procurement and delivery and it’s associated narrow consideration of “first costs”, is extremely wasteful and typically results in poor quality, project delays, excessive numbers of change orders, and overall higher costs.  Even approaches such as design-build or CM@R don’t achieve maximized performance and satisfaction levels.

BEST VALUE construction project delivery methods include Integrated Project Delivery – IPD, and Job Order Contracting, JOC.  Both contractually require collaboration among project participants and deliver superior quality as well as on-time and on-budget performance.

Best practice IPD, JOC and related collaborative LEAN construction delivery methods share the following  characteristics.

  1. Early and ongoing participation of all project participants (owners, contractors, A/Es, subs, engineering, procurement, project managers, planners, oversight groups, users)
  2. Documented roles, responsibilities, deliverables, and metrics
  3. Shared risk/reward
  4. Continuous improvement
  5. Common terms, definitions, and standardized information formats (for example, UNIFORMAT, MASTERFORMAT, IFC…)
  6. Financial transparency (example – commerical unit price book, UPB – material, equipment, labor, productivity).

4bt processOpenJOC

The are multiple benefits to be gained by LEAN construction delivery participants.

  • Improved Customer Service and Responsiveness.
  • Shorter Procurement Times
  • Decreased Overall Project Delivery Times
  • Reduced Procurement Costs
  • Greater Financial Visibility
  • Longer term relationships
  • Shared Risk/Reward
  • Higher Quality
  • Greater Frequency of On-time Projects
  • Greater Frequency of On-budget Projects
  • More Funds Allocated to Construction versus Administration
  • Fewer Change Orders
  • Virtually Elimination of Legal Disputes
  • Greater Overall Satisfaction
  • Best Value