VA’s / Veteran Administration’s Sustainability Initiative

The VA is doing some cool things in the BIM and Sustainability areas.  Below is a recent assessment initiative.

That said, the VA doesn’t have a standardized, efficient method to cost estimate and manage facility repair, renovation, sustainability, and minor new construction projects.  Most sites apparently rely upon the RSMeans Costworks product and ad hoc processes vs. a dedicated cost estimating and project management system.

The VA’s sustainability initiative would be well served to link dedicated tools to internal processes to improve accuracy, transparency, timelines, and scalability.

For example JOC / Job Order Contracting is being used, however, tools to support JOC would be a big win, especially if linked with BIM initiatives.  Costworks is not a cost estimating 0r project management system, but bascially RSMeans cost data in digital format.  Dedicated systems incorporate the various construction delivery methods and tools to dramatically increase collaboration among owners, contractors, and A/E’s, resulting in projects completed on-time and on-budget.

Veterans Administration Awards Contract to Green Building Initiative/Green Globes® for Online Evaluation Tool

01/25/2011
WASHINGTON D.C. — The Green Building Initiative, (GBI), a nonprofit organization dedicated to the acceleration of sustainable building practices, was recently awarded a contract with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to provide online, green building self-evaluations for 173 hospital facilities using Green Globes® Continual Improvement of Existing Buildings environmental rating and assessment tool.  As part of the contract, GBI will provide training for VA facilities management personnel who will be performing the web-enabled assessments.  This recent award follows a 2009 pilot project by the VA in which 21 hospitals across the US were assessed and certified using the Green Globes system.

The Green Globes Continual Improvement for Existing Buildings (CIEB) tool was selected and GBI was awarded the contract based on VA requirements that included:  tool compatibility with a third party green building rating system developed by an ANSI – accredited organization,  compatibility with the Federal High Performance and Sustainable Building Guidance dated 12/1/2008, cost, and demonstrated experience with the assessment and certification of other Federal Government facilities.

The Green Globes CIEB program helps establish performance baselines, best practices and certification for operations and maintenance of a building in the environmental assessment areas of energy, water, resource management and emissions and pollution. The fully interactive, web-enabled tool also allows facility personnel to measure, document, and improve the sustainability of a building over time.

On February 28, 2006 the Department of Veterans Affairs joined 21 Federal departments and agencies in signing the Memorandum of Understanding on Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings.  The MOU commits the signatories to demonstrate leadership in implementing common strategies for planning, acquiring, siting, designing, building, operating, and maintaining high performance and sustainable buildings. The Sustaining Guiding Principles employ integrated design, optimizing energy performance, protecting and conserving water, enhancing the indoor environment, and reducing the impact of materials as best practices to achieve these goals.

“The 173 buildings to be assessed encompass some of the largest and most complex commercial buildings in the US. This project represents the first steps in what could be a broader sustainability assessment/certification initiative spanning entire campuses,” commented Ward Hubbell, President of the Green Building Initiative. “Green Globes is highly compatible with the elements of the High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Guidance and is an important tool to help federal agencies evaluate compliance with the Executive Order,” he added.

Upon implementation, this project represents the first large scale, nationwide deployment and application of online evaluation tools for comprehensive sustainability assessment within a major Federal Government agency.

ABOUT THE GREEN BUILDING INITIATIVE: The mission of the Green Building Initiative is to accelerate the adoption of building practices that result in energy-efficient, healthier and environmentally sustainable buildings by promoting credible and practical green building approaches.  A not-for-profit education initiative, the GBI is supported by a broad cross section of organizations and individuals with an interest in residential and commercial construction.  For more information on the Green Building Initiative, please visit www.thegbi.org

 

 

 

The Top Three Requirements for Sustainability – High Performance Buildings & Green

1. Facility Life-cycle Management – Visibility into accurate building information from concept to design, bidding, procurement, construction, repair, renovation, maintenance, and demolition is a basic requirement for both new and existing buildings in order to impact sustainability on any type of broad scale.  Associated physical and functional conditions, costs, and what-if analysis tools are just an examples of the information needed.

2. Efficient Project Delivery Methods. The best high performance building concepts, for new or existing buildings, are of no value if they can not be implemented in a timely, cost-effective, and quality manner.   The AEC sector is notorious for waste, poor planning, and lack of efficient business processes.   “Newer” construction delivery methods such as IPD – Integrated Project Delivery and JOC – Job Order Contracting must be employed on a widespread basis.

3. Performance-Based Building Codes and Legislation. Existing buildings are responsible for the lion’s share of carbon output and energy consumption.  Current green initiatives in the private and public sector have been mostly “window dressing”, and strong legislation is required, inclusive of ongoing monitoring and associated incentives and penalties.

Buildings and Their Impact Upon The Environment

Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC)

Buildings responsible for over one-third of North America’s CO2 emissions

Report prescribes policies to slash buildings’ energy use

 

While this report tends to focus upon new buildings, and thus no directly address the major issue – existing buildings, a lot of the information is valuable.  Using existing methods and technologies it is possible to routinely reduce energy usage of existing buildings by 30, 40, or even 50 percent – should mandates, efficient construction delivery methods, such as JOC and IPD, and proven facility condition assessment/capital planning techniques be employed. – Blog Author

 

Promoting the green design, construction, renovation and operation of buildings could cut North American greenhouse gas emissions that are fuelling climate change more deeply, quickly and cheaply than any other available measure, according to the 2008 report issued by the trinational Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC).

North America’s buildings cause the annual release of more than 2,200 megatons of CO2 into the atmosphere, about 35 percent of the continent’s total.

Rapid market uptake of currently available and emerging advanced energy-saving technologies could result in over 1,700 fewer megatons of CO2 emissions in 2030, compared to projected emissions that year following a business-as-usual approach.

 

The report, Green Building in North America: Opportunities and Challenges, is the result of a two-year study by the CEC Secretariat. It was prepared with advice from an international advisory group of prominent developers and architects, sustainability and energy experts, real estate appraisers and brokers, together with local and national government representatives.

Despite proven environmental, economic and health benefits, green building today accounts for a only small fraction of new home and commercial building construction—just two percent of the new non-residential building market, less than half of one percent of the residential market in the United States and Canada, and less than that in Mexico.

“Improving our built environment is probably the single greatest opportunity to protect and enhance the natural environment. This report is a blueprint for dramatic environmental progress throughout North America—mostly using the tools and technology we have on hand today,” says CEC Executive Director Adrián Vázquez.

Even with rapid growth projected in the green building market across all three countries, the report says public and private sectors must embrace substantial changes to the planning, development and financing of commercial and residential buildings to overcome what it says are significant barriers to the widespread adoption of high-performance buildings throughout North America.

Report authors describe a number of disincentives to green building to be overcome. For example, how to encourage developers to incur the marginal cost of green building features when the long-term energy-saving benefits will be passed on to the new owners or tenants, and recommends ways to accelerate the market uptake of green building and make it the standard practice for all new construction and renovation of existing buildings in North America. Among its recommendations, the report calls upon North American government, industry and nongovernmental leaders to:

  • Create national, multi-stakeholder task forces charged with achieving a vision for green building in North America;
  • Support the creation of a North American set of principles and planning tools for green building;
  • Set clear targets to achieve the most rapid possible adoption of green building in North America, including aggressive targets for carbon-neutral or net zero-energy buildings, together with performance monitoring to track progress towards these targets;
  • Enhance ongoing or new support for green building, including efforts to promote private sector investment and proper valuation methods; and
  • Increase knowledge of green building through research and development, capacity building, and the use of labels and disclosures on green building performance.

The recommendations complement ongoing efforts by federal, state/provincial and local governments as well as industry and trade associations and nongovernmental organizations.

The CEC study notes several government and industry initiatives that promote aggressive energy performance improvements in the building sector. One study completed for the report signals the potential of green building to yield tremendous energy improvements and greenhouse gas emissions reductions in the building sector by 2030, and suggests a path toward zero net-energy and carbon-neutral buildings.


In Canada, buildings are responsible for:

  • 33 percent of total energy use;
  • 12 percent of non-industrial water consumption;
  • 50 percent of natural resource consumption;
  • 35 percent of greenhouse gas emissions;
  • 10 percent of airborne particulate production; and
  • 25 percent of landfill waste generation.

In Mexico, buildings are responsible for:

  • 17 percent of total energy use;
  • 5 percent of potable water consumption;
  • 25 percent of total electricity consumption;
  • 20 percent of all carbon dioxide emissions; and
  • 20 percent of the waste generated.

In the United States, buildings account for:

  • 40 percent of total energy use;
  • 12 percent of the total water consumption;
  • 68 percent of total electricity consumption;
  • 38 percent of total carbon dioxide emissions; and
  • 60 percent of total non-industrial waste generation.

In Canada, more than 123,000 new single-family homes were built in 2006. In the United States, an average of 1.24 million single-family homes is built every year. Mexico projects an average of 1 million new homes every year for the next 25 years.

Hundreds of coal-fired power plants, a key source of greenhouse gas emissions, are currently on the drawing boards in the United States. According to one report, 76 percent of the energy produced by these plants will go to operate buildings.

According to the report, Canada’s residential building sector is responsible for approximately 80 megatons of CO2 emissions annually and its commercial building sector for approximately 69 megatons of CO2.

In the United States, residential buildings account for approximately 1,210 megatons of CO2 per year while commercial buildings are responsible for approximately 1,020 megatons of CO2.

In Mexico, residential buildings account for approximately 42 megatons of CO2 emissions annually, while commercial buildings are responsible for approximately 20 megatons of CO2.

In 2001, the carbon associated with energy services to United States buildings alone constituted 8 percent of total global emissions of CO2, equal to all emissions from Japan and the United Kingdom combined.

Beyond individual buildings, poor patterns of building development often lead to congestion and inefficient use of land, resulting in greater energy consumption and travel time, loss of productivity, polluted runoff to surface water and wastewater treatment systems, loss of agricultural lands, fragmented habitats, and fiscal stress to local communities. Two case studies from Toronto indicate that residents of sprawling neighborhoods tend to emit more greenhouse gases per person and suffer more traffic fatalities.

Buildings contribute significantly to the use of key resources such as energy and water. For instance, in the United States, building operations consume 12 percent of fresh water supplies. In Canada, the building sector consumes half of all natural resources used and generates a quarter of all landfill waste. Worldwide, buildings consume around 40 percent of all raw materials.

Urban water run-off is another important building-related impact. Buildings, and transportation infrastructure that serve them, replace natural surfaces with impermeable materials, typically creating runoff that washes pollutants and sediments into surface water. Urban runoff is the fourth-leading cause of impairment of rivers, third-leading for lakes, and second for estuaries in the United States, and a significant problem in many parts of Mexico and Canada as well. In Mexico City, most rainwater flows on impermeable surfaces to the city drainage system; only a small proportion (11 percent) is recharged into the aquifer, causing a greater dependence on neighboring basins and increasing the risk of flooding.

In the United States, the annual cost of building-related sickness is estimated to be $58 billion. According to researchers, green building has the potential to generate an additional $200 billion annually in worker performance in the United States by creating offices with better indoor air.

Studies show that the cost premium to deliver sustainable properties to the market has declined considerably in recent years, and that experienced teams are delivering them at costs competitive with conventional buildings.

Governments at all levels are working to address obstacles to the uptake of green building through the integrated use of building codes; zoning regulations; tax-based incentives; and preferential treatment for green developers (such as fast-track permitting). In addition, green building practices are also being spurred by demand offset programs (in which a developer reduces energy and water demand as a condition of permitting); preferred purchasing; tax shifting; and government-supported research, development, and educational programs.

The US green building industry—almost non-existent a decade ago—is now worth upwards of $12 billion.

F

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The report was produced by the Secretariat of the CEC, prepared under Article 13 of the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC) and is not intended to reflect the views of the Parties to that agreement. Information for the report came from background reports prepared by independent experts and from two public meetings. The report and associated background reports, along with a portfolio of selected green buildings in Canada, Mexico and the United States, will be available to the public on 13 March 2008, at .

The CEC was established by Canada, Mexico and the United States to build cooperation among the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) partners in implementing NAAEC, the environmental side accord to NAFTA. The CEC addresses environmental issues of continental concern, with particular attention to the environmental challenges and opportunities presented by continent-wide free trade.

Contacts:

Mr. Eduardo Viadas
Commission for Environmental Cooperation
Tel: 1-514-350-4331
E-mail: eviadas@cec.org

Mr. Terry Collins
Tel: 1-416-538-8712, 1-416-878-8712
E-mail: terrycollins@rogers.com

Sustainability , Existing Buildings , and High Performance Performance Building Management

By now, it should be apparent that construction costs for a high performance building are not significantly high than “traditional” construction.   True, documentation associated with LEED can increase costs, however, LEED is not required, or even recommended for everyone.  

That said, what about existing buildings?  What project provide the highest return on investment? 

Typcially the highest ROI for sustainability initiatives can be achieved through;

1. better utilization of space (occupancy, space type, time …)

2. modification of user behaviors

3. automation (lighting and water controls, HVAC, energy management system(s), occupancy sensors)

4. HVAC (automation, retro-fit)

5. exterior shell improvements (window films, windows, weather sealing)

6. Lighting (high/higher efficiency lighting)

7. Power filtering and power distrbution systems 

via www.4clicks.com

RSMEANS Free Educational Webinar – JOB ORDER CONTRACTING JOC , THE STIMULUS (& SUSTAINABILITY) READY DELIVERY METHOD

Register

RS Means JOC Educational Seminar

Facility owners know that changes in occupancy, project requests and building lifecycle and infrastructure needs sometimes arrive quite suddenly with tight completion timelines—-spurring the need for quick and professional construction services to accommodate end user requirements.

Potential solution:  Already have a JOC program in place!

Job Order Contracting (JOC) is a construction project delivery method used by facility owners to access quick and professional contractor performance without compromising pricing predictability. It works
especially well for facility owners who might have high volume and/or backlog of smaller projects (mostly under $1M each), such as those found in educational, medical, municipal and federal facilities.

JOC involves indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (IDIQ) services—-which is basically an on-going construction services contract for projects yet to be determined by the owner. The method allows for mutually beneficial long-term relationships between facility owners and JOC contractors for construction services.

Therefore, a unique partnering approach to JOC contract management should be considered. This presentation will address what partnering actions owners can take to promote the successful use of JOC at their facilities.

In addition, this presentation will provide an overview of typical JOC contractor- submitted project proposal content as well as basic tips for the owner regarding JOC proposal review.

SPEAKERS
Mark E. Bailey
President and CEO, Centennial Contractors Enterprises, Inc.
Mark Bailey provides vision and direction to employees in over 40 offices across the country, focusing on Job Order Contracting and IDIQ contracts. Mark gained a wealth of field and office experience with a diverse 24 years of construction industry experience, ranging from superintendent and estimator to heavy civil contractor and project manager. He has authored an article about Job Order Contracting for ENR and is a member of the National and Virginia Chapter of Associated Builders and Contractors, Society of American Military Engineers, Design-Build Institute of America and Center for Job Order Contracting Excellence.
Allen L. Henderson
Consultant, Author, Former Facility Manager, Texas State University
Allen Henderson has 35 years of construction industry experience, including over 25 years at Texas State University-San Marcos. A long-time proponent of the JOC method of construction project delivery, Allen is author of Job Order Contracting—Expediting Construction Project Delivery, published by RSMeans, and has given numerous presentations on the subject. He is currently a board member for the Center for Job Order Contracting Excellence.
John R. Murray
Director, State of Missouri Division of Facilities Management
John Murray is the Missouri State Director of Contract Services for the Division of Facilities Management, Design and Construction. John additionally serves as Vice Chairman of the Planning & Zoning Committee for the Village of Wardsville, Mo and as AIA-CEC-MO Liaison Committee member.
MODERATOR
Robert F. Gair
Principal, RSMeans Business Solutions
Robert F. Gair has over 20 years of construction industry experience in cost modeling and job order contracting and is currently responsible for the fastest growing sector of RSMeans businesses. A business analyst with extensive computer technology experience, Bob provides property management solutions to federal agencies such as the Department of Energy, Department of Labor, and State Department. He was also the 2009 Industry Chair for the Center for Job Order Contracting Excellence.

Why DBB – Design Bid Build is Dead – Or Should Be!

Facilities ” Sustainability ”  must be viewed from two perspectives simultaneously – environmental and economic.
In higher education, just as an example, colleges and universities need to change there ” facilities business model” just to survive.   Colleges and universities must  reduce their carbon footprint to deal with global climate change, however, they also need to address total cost of ownership to survive financially.
Second to personnel/labor costs, facilities represent the second largest operating expenditure for this sector… and many, if not most, others.

To deal with facility renovation, repair, and sustainability an alternative to design-bid-build (DBB)  is required.

DBB is inefficient,  too costly and too slow and is not performance-based, nor does it encourage collaboration or quality.

Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) of the building, not just construction costs including renovation, repair costs,  and associated modifications have to be factored over the next 10-20 years at a minimum, as well as life-time operations costs.

While IPD and BIM offer the promise of collaboration among owners, constractors and AE’s to a plan construct, or modify a building that meets long-term needs; otherwise not possible with design-bid-build; JOC / Job Order Contracting is a proven method deployable today for facility repair, renovation, and sustainability construction project that meets all criteria for collaborative, quality, time shortening, an a performance-based approach.

With a supporting software technology, the JOC process can be consistently deployed and critical domain information relative to project costing and management retained for future use.

Furthermore, from a “green” sustainability perspective, there isn’t a single larger (multi-building) portfolio owner that can meet future energy reduction requirement via new “LEED” or similar building alone.

Existing building retrofit will be the key, and JOC is well suited to the task of associated shell, HVAC, lighting, and other energy related projects.

BIM will certainly play a role, especially as 4D, 5D BIM becomes are reality.  That said, however, an efficient CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY METHOD MUST be integrated with any BIM strategy.  Again… JOC meets the performance requirements.

With 66% of facility owners primarly using  DBB / use design-bid-build yet only 23% believing it offers the best value, the accelerating adoption of JOC isn’t surprising.

It’s time for ALL facility owners to be rid of the status quo…. and bury DBB.
DBB,  RIP.
By Estimators For Estimators

JOC – BIM – Facility Management – Capital Planning

4d-5d BIM will support facility management and associated construction projects, however, more efficient construction project delivery methods MUST be linked to your BIM strategy.

Integrated with 4D,5d BIM or stand alone, Job Order Contracting – JOC / SABER – sets the performance “bar” for facility renovation, repair, and sustainability construction project control and transparency.

Whether your in higher education, k-12, state/local government, DOD, or healthcare, the need to increase construction project efficiency has never been greater.    JOC reduces costs and increases quality by fostering collaboration, rewarding performance, and cutting through the archaic, ad-hoc processes associated with traditional DBB (design build build) and provides additional benefits vs. design build.

From concept, through close-out, proven software (see http://www.4clicks.com if interested) is available to embed and assure the JOC process and it is populated with an exclusive 400,000 line item extension of the RSMeans cost database.

Features and benefits included in the JOC software technology deliver robust performance and “real-time” visibility for managing construction projects, programs, and contracts including JOC, SABER, IDIQ, SATOC, MATOC, MACC, POCA, and BOA.  Also…. collaboration, cost control, automated technical evaluation, document management and full reporting capabilities.

see more at: http://www.4clicks.com

2011 – New Green – High Performance Building Code – California


“The mandatory provisions of CALGreen go into effect in January and anyone involved in designing and/or building new commercial or residential structures in California needs to know about the new requirements,”

– Dave Walls, executive director of the California Building Standards Commission.

In 2011, CALGreen, the nation’s first state-wide green building code, will become mandatory.

CALGreenCode – CALGreen – 2010 – DRAFT

Architects, developers, plan checkers, inspectors, building officials and others involved in designing and approving new construction will be expected to adhere to new mandatory guidelines on issues ranging from water efficiency and conservation to indoor air quality.

via http://www.4clicks.com

Leading construction cost estimating and project management software for JOC , SABER , SATOC , MATOC ,  MACC ,  IDIQ , BOA , POCA …. for facilty renovation, repair, and sustainability.  Featuring exclusive 400,000 line item RS Means data extension.

The Value of BIM – Building Information Modeling – IPD – Integrated Project Delivery and JOC (Job Order Contracting)

The true value of BIM in NOT in 3D modeling, clash detection, or providing architects and AEC firms a with a better way to “sell” new projects/buildings.

The value of BIM is in INFORMATION and the associated aspects of collaboration and life-cycle building management / total cost of ownership.

BIM is NOT technology alone, but a business process that is embedded within and support by technology. Autodesk, Bentley, Archicad, et al can not and do not supply BIM. They supply basic components of BIM, the 3D visualization engine and an associated database architecture … (both hopefully based upon open standards or they will be of little value). While all three would argue the point, facts are facts. There is too much domain knowledge required for life-cycle management for a single technology vendor to cover “all the bases”.

It up to Owners, Contractors, AE’s, and the wide range of Consultants and Complementary Technology/Software Providers to deliver true value to BIM – space planning, capital planning, operations and maintenance, costing/cost engineering, standardized taxonomies, metrics, benchmarks, decision support, collaborative project delivery processes, etc. …. components that enable a complete BIM system.

Transparent standardized information, collaboration and technology may someday enable BIM to deliver integrated construction / renovation / repair / maintenance / sustainability project delivery on a life-cycle basis.

In the interim, both JOC (job order contracting) and IPD (integrated project delivery) deliver today relative to exponentially more efficient and transparent construction project delivery methods and processes. Both are superior to design-bid-build, design-build, etc. etc.

Both JOC and IPD demand collaboration and both are performance based. JOC drives the project from concept/scoping through bidding, construction, warranty, and close-out.

IPD currently focuses upon collaboration from project conception through start-up, however, can be easily extended.

The limited view of IPD. The contractual IPD based upon various standardized IPD contracts ( IFoA – integrated form of agreement, etc). While the more important view of IPD is extension of the collaborative processes throughout the project and associated use of technology.

JOC already provides IPD and associated technology for renovation, repair, maintenance, and sustainability projects. It is a proven process, developed by the U.S. military years ago, however, currently, vastly improved through the use of technology such as that provided by e4Clicks (www.e4Clicks.com) and associated reference cost information (RSMeans) or other price “guides”.

JOC ( also known as SABER in the Air Force ) is available today for renovation, repair, and sustainability projects and is proven to improve collaboration and quality as well as reduce costs. Paperwork costs, which average 2-3% of total project costs are mitigated using JOC cost estimating and project management software (such as e4Clicks Project Estimator), while project timelines can be reduced dramatically, providing exponential value.

While the importance of BIM can not be overlooked as it will hopefully reshape the AEC industry, BIM is currently limited to 3D CAD and modest functionality, requiring the integration of third party software for CAFM, CMMS, CPMS, and JOC to reach it’s potential.

Protocols for Performance Measurement Offered by Leading Building Groups ASHRAE – USBBC – CIBSE

ATLANTA – It’s long been realized in the building industry that you can’t manage what you don’t measure when it comes to building performance. But even if you measure, what ensures that those measurements are appropriate and meaningful?

“Although many buildings claim to be green or high performance, it’s rare that evidence or data is presented to verify these claims,” said Jeff Haberl. “If claims of high performance are to be credible, it is essential that a common set of measurements be used and that the results be reported against meaningful and consistent benchmarks. Reliable and reproducible protocols are also needed to give usable feedback to designers and operators when measured performance does not match design intent and expectations.”

A new book from three leading building industry associations provides a standardized set of protocols over a range of accuracies and costs that can be applied consistently to the assessment of building performance. Published by ASHRAE and developed in collaboration with the Chartered Institution of Building Service Engineers (CIBSE) and the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), Performance Measurement Protocols for Commercial Buildingsidentifies what to measure, how to measure it and how often it is to be measured for inclusion in buildings’ operation and maintenance plan. 

“In an energy conscious world, those who measure and manage the energy use and performance of their buildings will be at an increasing advantage over business as usual energy managers,” Haberl, who chaired the committee that wrote the book, said.  Because energy efficiency should not compromise the services provided in the building, the protocols cover indoor environmental quality measures as well as energy and water use.

“The collaboration of CIBSE with ASHRAE and USGBC on this project demonstrates the importance of international engineering collaboration to deliver measurably green buildings, not just green promises,” said Hywel Davies, technical director of CIBSE and vice chair of the committee.

Protocols are developed at three levels for each of six performance categories: energy, water, thermal comfort, indoor air quality, lighting and acoustics.

The three specification levels are:

  • basic level, which outlines simple, low-cost measures that provide an initial insight into performance at the annual, whole-building level
  • intermediate level, which provides additional data on the building performance, typically at a monthly frequency and major system level
  • advanced level, which offers a more detailed and comprehensive analysis for those building owners or managers wishing to gain deeper insights into the performance of a building, typically at a daily or weekly frequency at the system or equipment level.

The cost of Performance Measurement Protocols for Commercial Buildings is $89 ($75 ASHRAE members).

To order, contact ASHRAE Customer Service at 1-800-527-4723 (United States and Canada) or 404-636-8400 (worldwide), fax 404-321-5478, or visit www.ashrae.org/bookstore.

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via Protocols for Performance Measurement Offered by Leading Building Groups.