Why BIM should be renamed BIMM – The Value of BIM

BIM should should have been can BIMM – Building Information Modeling and Management. The emphasis upon 3D is silly, and the focus upon 3D replacing 2D is equally misdirected.

Products like Revit and Archicad are only relatively small components of a BIM solution.  BIM is a process embedded within and support by digital technology that enables more efficient cradle-to-grave management of the built environment.

Owners, contractors, A/E’s, oversight groups, and communities will all benefit from BIM relative to the management and usage of the built environment.

As many say, the “I” in BIM is the critical aspect.  Defensible, accessible, transparent, accurate and re-usable information is the true value of BIM.

Why Revit is NOT BIM !

If you think Revit is BIM, please stop now.

Revit is a BIM tool, as are similar products from Graphisoft, Bentley Systems, etc. etc.  These tools provide the basic 3d design/rendering/engineering components of BIM (and, yes I know, some additional functionality) and associated object technologies. 

BIM on the other hand is a business process enabling cradle-to-grave life-cycle management of the built environment supported by a variety of techologies, of which Revit is  just “one”.

Those who have spent ten to thirty plus years in the AEC sector know how much a  laggard our industry is versus others when it comes to efficient business processes and supporting technologies.  As a result, the adoption of BIM will REQUIRE fundamental “cultural changes” in AEC business practices.  The basic business foundations of the AEC community must adapt to enable BIM and it’s resulted added value to flourish.

Sure, the risks that come with change are ever present, however, the reward, a productive AEC industry, will benefit everyone… owners, users/occupants, contractors, architects, engineers, software providers, business product manufactuers, and the community at large.

BIM Deployment Plan from Revit / Autodesk

BIM Strategy

The Autodesk BIM Deployment Plan – tools and guidance for building industry professionals interested in implementing Building Information Modeling (BIM) – is a reasonable framework for those beginning to investigate BIM, however, it lacks requisite depth relative to 4d, 5d BIM as well as contruction delivery methodology.  

A comprehensive BIM strategy from an owner perspective (and, in my opinion contractor and A/E’s as well as other stakeholders), should include capital planning and management (lifecycle costing, capital renewal, physical/functional conditions management), operations and maintenance (repair, maintenance, minor renovations-preventive, routine, maintenace), space planning/management, and integration of efficient construction devlivery methodsy (JOC – Job Order Contracting for facility repair/maintenance, IPD – Integrated Project Delivery for new construction, etc.), and associated reference cost data, standard definitions/metrics/taxonomy, ….

Tools offered in the Autodesk BIM deploym,ent plan are intended to provide a practical framework for AEC stakeholders, and can be used by individual organizations on specific projects. The BIM Deployment Plan includes:

  • BIM support materials for owners, architects, engineers, and contractors
  • Templates to streamline multi-discipline communications
  • Recommendations for roles and responsibilities
  • Best business process examples
  • Software suggestions for an effective BIM environment

BIM_Deployment_Plan_Final

Definitions of Terms Used in This Document
 

As-Built Model Model

—The final model that shows how a building was actually delivered and assembled. Sometimes referred to as the Record Model.

Building Information Modeling (BIM)—An integrated process aimed at providing coordinated, reliable information about a building project throughout different project phases—from design through construction and into operations.  BIM gives architects, engineers, builders, and owners a clear overall vision of the project—to help them make better decisions faster, improve quality, and increase profitability of the project. 
 
Clash Detection — The process of checking for clashes and interferences in the design of one or more BIM models.

 

Collaborative Project Management — A software solution that enables effective management of and collaboration on all project related communication, information, and business processes across the plan, build, and operate phases of the building lifecycle. The most common processes include collaborative documentation, design, bid, construction, cost, and operations management.  (Examples of software include www.4clicks.com Project Estimator for JOC construction delivery).     Coordination Model—A model created from two or more models, used to show the relationship of multiple building disciplines such as architectural, civil, structural, and MEP (mechanical, electrical, and plumbing).

Core Collaboration Team —The group of people – which should include someone from each party working on the project, such as the owner, architect, contractor, subconsultants, suppliers, and trade contractors—responsible for completing a BIM Deployment Plan, creating the document management file folder structure and permission levels in the collaborative project management system, and enforcing the action plan set out in that document throughout design and construction of the project.
Design Intent Model —The model used to communicate the design intent of a building.
Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) —A neutral and open file format structure developed by the International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI) to enable interoperability between modeling software systems.
Integrated Project Delivery (IPD)—A project delivery process (similar to JOC for facility repair, renovation, and sustainabilty)  that integrates people, systems, business structures, and practices to collaboratively harness the talents and insights of all participants in order to optimize project results, increase value to the owner, reduce waste, and maximize efficiency throughout all phases of design, fabrication, and construction (AIA,  Integrated Project Delivery: A Guide , 2007, available at http://www.aia.org/ipdg).
Model Integrator—A tool used to combine and/or link design files from different software platforms.
Model Manager(s)—The project team member(s) responsible for managing the collaboration and sharing of electronic files during the project. Model managers are also responsible for maintaining the integrity of BIM models, which can include gathering, linking, and uploading updated models.
Parametric —The relationships among and between all elements of a model that enable coordination and change management. These relationships are created either automatically by the software or manually by users as they work.
Project System Administrator (PSA) —The person who administers, and sets up folders for, the collaborative project management system. Responsible for managing and creating new user accounts, as well as contact and company information. 

Attention Facility Owners – BIM and Facility Management / FM

The true benefits of BIM are in facility life-cycle management.

While clash detection and pretty pictures are nice, BIM can and will transform the AEC industry by providing a desperately needed robust and transparent process for monitoring and managing the built environment.

As a result of my recently working with NIBS/WBDB/BIM LIBRARY, I became aware of the below survey for Facility Owners, and Facility Operations and Maintenance Professionals (O&M professionals, facility engineers, …) developed by a University of New Mexico graduate student.

Please take time to complete the survey.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The survey consists of a two (2) part questionnaire, beginning with an initial set questions on your facility characteristics and how you currently access information and perform O&M activities.
Then, after watching a short video titled  “View of the Future for Facilities Management”, a set of questions that assess the benefits and impact of BIM on your current work practices will follow.

Because we value your time and input, the survey is designed to be completed in about 5 minutes, including watching the video.

The survey is located on the BIMWorkx.com website The direct link: http://www.bimworkx.com/index.phpoption=com_content&view=article&id=89&Itemid=69

Please forward this survey on to other Facilities Owners and Organizations, as the intent is to collect a comprehensive set of survey data to encourage owner’s implementation of BIM.
Please note that your name and your facility will not be identified with any of the results.

If you have any questions or comments please do not hesitate to contact Francisco Forns-Samso at 505-340-8471, or by email at fforns@unm.edu
Thank you for your support.



Energy Building Labeling is Here ! Importance of JOC to rapidly and efficiently estimate, procure, and construct projects?

JOC (Job order contracting) is an efficient method to deploy sustainability projects across building portfolios.  The JOC project delivery method is proven, accurate, enables collaboration, and is transparent.  See http://www.4clicks.com for more and to download a JOC Blue Paper for additional information.

Below by: BY JEANNE ROBERTS MAY 14, 2010,

ALL NEW YORK CITY MUNICIPAL BUILDINGS BENCHMARKED FOR ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Recently New York City’s Bloomberg administration announced the completion of a benchmarking project for the city’s municipal buildings that will insure every city-owned structure in excess of 10,000 square feet meets very strict energy efficiency requirements.

Energy Labeling and JOC

The project, initiated on December 9, 2009 with the passage of the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan(formally known as Intro. No. 476-A, Benchmarking Energy and Water Use), puts the city at the head of a national effort to improve building energy efficiency aimed at reducing America’ carbon footprint and its use of highly pollutive fossil fuels to generate electricity.

For New York City, the benchmarking of 2,790 municipal properties represents a first step on a road which will benchmark both public and private buildings by May 1, 2011. The exception is only size; privately owned buildings must be larger than 50,000 square feet.

The Plan aims to reduce the city’s total carbon footprint by 30 percent by 2030 (originally 2017), with five percent of that reduction coming from government, commercial and residential building. After the initial phase is completed, building owners will be required to benchmark yearly.

For New York City, which worked with 28 individual city agencies under the auspices of the Department of Citywide Administrative Services to measure total electricity, natural gas, steam and fuel oil consumption, the achievement will allow the city to deliver energy efficiency funding (under NYSERDA, or the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority) to buildings most likely to benefit based on their age, size and condition.

The project used the U.S. Environmental Agency’s (EPA’s) Energy Star Portfolio Manager energy management tool, which is integral to the LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification process, as established and managed by the U.S. Green Building Council, or USGBC.

The benchmarking paradigms, which include water as well as energy use, are expected to reduce carbon dioxide emissions in the city by 1.68 million tons compared to 2006 levels.

Financially speaking, the Bloomberg administration expects to reach break-even on energy efficiency investments by 2013; two years later, it anticipates saving more on the city’s energy bills – which currently stand at US$800 million a year – than will be spent to retrofit the buildings.

It’s an ambitious plan, employing not only the EPA’s energy management tool but also TRIRIGA‘s TREES software to monitor and thus reduce energy use, which is currently responsible for about 64 percent of the city’s municipal carbon emissions.

Beginning Sept. 1, 2011, the city will post municipal building benchmark results on the Internet; a year later, commercial buildings will also be posted, on the same site as tax assessments.

On May 11, 2010 the Bloomberg administration also completed a solar assessment of the city, using a Shrike Commander operating a laser-guided viewer/mapper to determine how many roofs within the city are suitable for solar photovoltaic installations.

At a cost of US$450,000, it seems the most sensible assessment by a government entity yet, particularly as data will also be used to assess flood-prone areas.

The federal government also offers energy use assessment advice, assistance and funding to individual commercial building owners through its Commercial Building Partnerships (CPB), using ARRA funds to implement energy saving measures of up to 30 percent for existing buildings and 50 percent for new buildings.

This will likely be very helpful to building owners in smaller cities across the U.S., where municipal and regional government funding has been severely impacted by a recession that appears to be hanging on by its fingernails.

4D – 5D BIM – Strategic Total Cost of Ownership Framework

The true value of BIM is Total Cost of Ownership / Life-cycle Management, NOT 3D visualization.

TCOpcholakis

Once we move toward this goal in an integrated manner, owners and the AEC industry will be able to transition toward a collaborative, efficient method of working together to address the significant sustainability and economic issues faced by all.

The consistent use of appropriate terminology provides a foundation for the establishment of robust, scalable and repeatable processes, best practices, methodologies, standards, metrics and benchmarks for facilities and
physical infrastructure management.  Common terminology also enables effective communication among the various decision makers, building managers, operators and technicians involved with facilities and physical
infrastructure investment and management.
4D – 5D – BIM provides a business process and a supporting technology backbone to leverage the above and drive transformational AEC industry change.
To help foster effective communication among public and private-sector organizations with interests in facilities, infrastructure and real property, a charter, inter-association  I catalyzed and organized the formation of a group several years ago.  A  Definitions Committee was established in June 2002. The Committee was comprised of representatives of the National Association of State Facilities Administrators, the Association of Higher
Education Facilities Officers/APPA, the Federal Facilities Council, the International Facility Management Association, Holder Construction Company and Infrastructure Strategies, my consulting company at the time.
The task was to put forward a framework and a glossary of terms commonly used to communicate about facilities-related issues, from space
planning and construction, through operations and upgrades, to demolition/replacement.
This document represents the culmination of the Definitions Committee’s work. The framework, glossary of terms and associated metrics contained within will be put forward for adoption or approval by the respective
governing bodies of the participating organizations.
The Asset Lifecycle Model for Total Cost of Ownership Management (Figure 1) defines the cradle to grave responsibility for measuring and managing a physical asset’s useful life. The framework provides a structure to help property owners, managers, overseers and others determine and manage the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) to best support their particular organization’s overall business or mission. In this instance, the Model is
used as a framework for organizing the glossary of commonly used terms and definitions.
The Asset Lifecycle Model has its foundation in the activities that occur over the lifetime of a physical asset -programming, design, construction, operations, maintenance, repairs and utilization – and the core skills or
COMPETENCIES required perform these activities. The competencies are further aligned with the business areas supporting specialized asset management business processes and practices, referred to as
INDUSTRIES. This organization gives focus to the resources and skills required to effectively manage an asset in any particular phase of its lifecycle. How well the industry or competency is being performed will
impact an asset’s useful life. The glossary of terms and definitions is organized by industry – space management, project delivery
management, operations management, capital asset management – and competencies. Metrics and/or cost models that can be used to measure the level of performance of each industry and competency are identified.
The definitions for each of the identified terms are derived from earlier work of the participating organizations and modified by the Definitions Committee.
It is the hope of the Definitions Committee that by learning from each other, sharing best practices and otherwise developing a rapport for future partnering and cooperation, we can, in some small measure,
contribute to more effective facilities and infrastructure asset management across the entire industry.

The above can be used in concert with COBIE / COBIE2 , IFC , as well as other important standards.

4d 5d BIM and COBIE – What you should know?

Some government agencies, such as the Veterans Administration (VA) now require the use of COBIE.

VA has adopted COBIE as the methodology to electronically transfer building information after construction is complete for facilities management. The COBIE spreadsheet (see COBIE2 Template) is part of the U.S. National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS).

Third-party utilities facilitate the automatic creation and transfer of some data between BIM and a COBIE spreadsheet via IFC files as an intermediate stage, and some BIM software may include creation of and data transfer to the spreadsheet directly without making use of intermediate IFC files.

Where possible, automatic means should be used to create and fill in the COBIE spreadsheet.

The Design/Construction Team shall consult their BIM software vendor(s) for the most current COBIE utilities. However, the completed COBIE worksheets will also contain some information that is entered manually into the electric file, either because the information currently cannot be conveniently extracted from the BIM or because it does not reside in the BIM.

The Design/Construction Team is encouraged to provide as much information in COBIE as is known at the time of the deliverable. The required worksheets in COBIE will be filled out in step with the LoD and Design Phases (see Object Element Matrix).

The Design/Construction Team(s) shall submit the most current version of the COBIE spreadsheet with other required deliverables at each Project Phase.

With CD deliverables, the COBIE-4- Type and Component worksheets are required. These fields provide component Name, Description, and Creation Date. The medical equipment listed in the VA-SEPS-PFD export shall be noted on the COBIE spreadsheet.

VA also requires sustainability related testing.

Virtual Testing and Balancing

The VA requires virtual testing and balancing of the architectural model to support sustainable building systems design and analysis. Room data can be read from the linked architectural model to create mechanical spaces (each space is the same as the room in the architectural model). Multiple spaces are joined to create zones. This data can used to calculate native heating and cooling analysis that is built into the MEP software or exported using gbXML to an external analysis application such as eQuest, Trane/Trace, or DOE based analysis programs. AEs can then bring this data back within the model to check their work. One of the methods is to create a Space/Room schedule that will show calculated air flow vs actual air flow. See figure below. All air flows can be checked for load balance to the terminal box and all the way back to the air handling units. Check with MEP modeling software companies for additional information.

Space Airflow Schedule

-1- Additional space engineering criteria will be added over time.

-2- With the exception of “Army_Cat,” “Navy_Cat,” and “USAF_Cat,” which can be removed.

-3- Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, Fire protection (MEPF)

-4- www.wbdg.org/pdfs/cobie_spreadsheet.pdf

-5- Generally this is weekly

-6- Fixtures, Furniture, & Equipment (FFE)

BIM Applications

At a minimum, BIM shall be used for the following applications:

7.1 Space and Medical Equipment Validation

VA-SEPS Data Required in BIM: VA uses the Space and Equipment Planning System (VA-SEPS), which is a data based planning tool shared by the VA, U.S. Navy, Army, and Air Force to create a Program for Design (PFD). Information regarding medical need requirements is entered to generate the space requirements and medical equipment associated with that space for a particular project. The output of VA-SEPS is a PFD containing a list of rooms (spaces) and medical equipment, with their identifying computer codes used to associate and track this information through design and construction.-1- Some of these codes will ultimately be imported into the facility management software to provide VA with the ability to manage, track, and report on VA’s spatial inventory, medical equipment, and building equipment. In addition, the BIM software will automatically assign a unique GUID to spaces which will identify each individual space.

The BIM is required to capture this space and equipment data in the BIM model. All BIM modeling must preserve the field name designations and text values found in the VA-SEPS BIM export files.-2- To do this, the final PFD for each project must be electronically exported from the VA-SEPS database for import and reuse in BIM. A spreadsheet export can be obtained in VA-SEPS by going to the Selection Tree and clicking on Select a Project, then choosing the proper project. Then on the sub-menu, select Export Project Data to BIM. This will create a MS Excel file with the associated data codes, which can then be imported into the BIM software’s “space” tool and equipment data into “elements” or “objects” tools appropriate to the particular BIM software, or the data can be linked in a database external to the BIM software. Medical spaces and medical equipment shall be derived from the model and validated against the PFD electronically at each submittal stage.

Note that if the original PFD was not developed using VA-SEPS or if new spaces are added during the design process, then a new VA-SEPS-PFD export must be created to obtain the proper codes.

7.2 Architecture—Spatial and Material Design Models

The timing of the Level of Development (LoD) required for elements(s) or systems(s) will be dependent entirely upon the project execution strategy used for the project, as the deliverables and their timing will be different for DBB than for DB or IDP.

The Object Element Matrix shows the evolution of the architectural spatial model as it is refined during the design process as the project progresses toward construction. As materials and components are selected, generic assemblies shall be assigned material properties, sizes, sustainability credits tracked, and other specific component information defined to clearly identify building features such as walls, floors, roofs, doors, and windows. The program space requirements shall be modeled in the spatial model and validated electronically against the PFD at each stage of the project and submitted with the required deliverables.

7.3 Energy Analysis

Energy simulation and life-cycle cost calculations shall be based on information extracted directly from BIM and validated by energy modeling. The models shall be created to a Level of Development (LoD) and quality as required to perform an energy analysis appropriate for the phase and decision requirements of the project. When internal spaces are defined, they shall be modeled with internal environment parameters for early MEP design.

Design Teams shall utilize energy modeling and sustainable design software that extracts BIM data to the appropriate file format for the analysis tool.

7.4 Design Visualization for Communication, Functional Analysis, and Constructability

BIM provides the opportunity to build a virtual building and to virtually test that building for functionality during design. This allows project stakeholders to see and understand design solutions that represents reality so they can work towards improving the building design before construction starts. VA is open to innovation and encourages the Design Team to find efficiencies and uses for BIM to enhance communication for the project. At a minimum, the model shall be integrated into design reviews, review submittals, and 3D construction documentation views. Areas that would benefit from the use of 3D imagery and fly-throughs during the design process and during construction shall be identifed and noted in the BMP(s).

Visualization tools refer to animations, fly-throughs, static 3D renderings, 4D process sequencing, and other techniques to assist decisionmaking and comprehension. It should be noted that even though the BIMs contain most of the source information needed for visualization, they may require further refinement in specific animation and visualization software to accomplish the intended results.

During design, special consideration must be given to medical staff and maintenance issues. At a minimum, BIM shall be used to validate:

  • Nurses’ walking distances
  • Nurse-station sightlines
  • Process areas where timing and volume may be problemmatic (such as patient queuing for waiting rooms and pharmacy, pharmacy delivery routes/timing
  • Supply, Processing, & Distribution (SPD)
  • Animations/graphics showing major building equipment and medical equipment space clearance reservations for operations, repair, maintenance, replacement
  • Color coding of floorplates for determining medical room/department locations and square footages, and circulation
  • Constructability

The Design and ConstructionTeams are encouraged to explore options to use the BIM and other electronic tools to enhance the project quality and delivery times, including quantity take-offs, cost estimating, overall project scheduling, subcontractor coordination and manpower loading, off-site fabrication, and other widely discussed BIM benefits.

7.5 Building System Models—Structural, MEPF,-3- and Interiors

Structural, MEPF, and interior design information is required to be developed in BIM.

7.6 Masterplan Space Scheduling and Sequencing—4D

For design work that includes sequencing of renovation swing space or masterplanning for long-term build-out, BIM 4D shall be used to illustrate the phasing plan to interact, communicate, and get approval of the final design and spatial sequencing with the medical staff.

7.7 Communication of Construction Scheduling and Sequencing—4D

The Contractor shall link BIM to the project schedule as a communication method to coordinate with the Medical Center and the VA Resident Engineer logistics that affect medical center operations or require shutdown of any affected facilities and utilities. The animated phasing plan shall address such issues as swing space during construction, parking interruptions, and re-routing of pedestrian/vehicular traffic, or any other construction work that could affect Medical Center operations.

It is recommended that the Contractor also use BIM – 4D in schedule planning and communication with the subcontractors and to understand the impact to the construction schedule of other changes during the duration of the project.

7.8 COBIE/Commissioning

VA has adopted COBIE as the methodology to electronically transfer building information after construction is complete for facilities management. The COBIE spreadsheet (see COBIE2 Template) is part of the U.S. National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS). Third-party utilities facilitate the automatic creation and transfer of some data between BIM and a COBIE spreadsheet via IFC files as an intermediate stage, and some BIM software may include creation of and data transfer to the spreadsheet directly without making use of intermediate IFC files. Where possible, automatic means should be used to create and fill in the COBIE spreadsheet.

The Design/Construction Team shall consult their BIM software vendor(s) for the most current COBIE utilities. However, the completed COBIE worksheets will also contain some information that is entered manually into the electric file, either because the information currently cannot be conveniently extracted from the BIM or because it does not reside in the BIM.

The Design/Construction Team is encouraged to provide as much information in COBIE as is known at the time of the deliverable. The required worksheets in COBIE will be filled out in step with the LoD and Design Phases (see Object Element Matrix).

  • The Design/Construction Team(s) shall submit the most current version of the COBIE spreadsheet with other required deliverables at each Project Phase.
  • With CD deliverables, the COBIE-4- Type and Component worksheets are required. These fields provide component Name, Description, and Creation Date. The medical equipment listed in the VA-SEPS-PFD export shall be noted on the COBIE spreadsheet.

7.9 Clash Detection/Coordination

General

  • It is the Design/Construction Team’s responsibility to conduct and manage an adequate and thorough Clash Detection process so that all major interferences between building components will have been detected and resolved before construction. It shall the goal of the Design/Construction Teams to reduce the number of changes during construction due to major building interferences to zero.
  • The BIM Manager shall assemble a composite model from all of the model parts of each design discipline for the purpose of performing a visual check of the building design for spatial and system coordination. Vertical shafts should also be reviewed to ensure that adequate space has been allocated for all of the vertical mechanical systems and that all of the shafts line up floor to floor. Prior to each scheduled coordination meeting, an updated clash report will be issued by the BIM Manager to the technical discipline consultants.
  • On a multistory project, the models may need to be split on a level-by-level basis for MEPF coordination. If a floor is particularly large, it may also need to be split by zones to reduce file size. Typically, 3D clash detection/coordination continues on a single floor until building systems are fully coordinated, and then continues on the next floor up.
  • Coordination software shall be used for assembling the various design models to electronically identify, collectively coordinate resolutions, and track and publish interference reports between all disciplines. The technical disciplines shall be responsible for updating their models to reflect the coordinated resolution.
  • The team shall review the model and the Clash Reports in coordination meetings on a regular as-needed-5- basis throughout the design phases until all spatial and system coordination issues have been resolved.
  • During the construction phase, the accuracy of fabrication models shall be verified. Prior to each fabrication submittal for approval, fabrication contractors shall submit their models to the Contractor’s BIM Manager for integration and clash detection/coordination and resolution.
  • Internal Clash Resolution – Design Consultants and Subcontractors who are responsible for multiple scopes of work are expected to coordinate the clashes between those scopes prior to providing those models to the BIM Manager for spatial and system coordination.
  • Spatial Coordination Verification: Verification and tracking of resolved conflicts of all trade coordination issues which could result in change orders or field conflicts shall be provided to VA during project milestone dates, and should be fully resolved before bidding.
  • For ease of identification during the 3D Clash Detection/Coordination process, it is recommended that the following trades be represented in these assigned colors:

Trade colors for Clash Detection

Architecture: White
Structural Steel: Maroon
Concrete: Gray
HVAC Equipment: Gold
HVAC Supply Duct/Diffuser: Blue
HVAC Return Duct/Diffuser: Magenta
HVAC Pipe: Gold
Electrical Equipment: Dark Yellow
Electrical Conduits: Light Yellow
Communication Conduit: Light Blue
Electrical Cable Tray: Dark Orange
Electrical Lighting: Yellow
Plumbing Water: Cyan
Plumbing Sewer: Magenta
Plumbing Storm Drain: Green
Fire Protection: Red
Pneumatic Tube: Dark Green
Equipment (Medical): Light Green
Medical Gas: Light Green
Security Systems: Orange
Fire Alarm: Fuchsia.

Minimum Requirements for Spatial Coordination and Clash Detection

  1. Architecture + Structural: Below-grade spaces, proposed floor plates with major penetrations, floor-to-floor heights, beam clearances, heavy utilities locations, floor loads, core, and vertical shafts, beam depths and required clearances, patient lift mechanisms, slab thickness, columns, column caps, and seismic bracing. Provide adequate space for construction and maintenance access to structural elements, building equipment, and distribution systems.
  2. Architecture + MEPF: Structural and space elements, flow and isolation requirements, proposed functional area configurations, floor-to-floor heights, fire containment, vertical and horizontal transportation. Possible future expansions shall be considered and shall be clash-free.
  3. MEPF/HVAC + Architecture, Structure, and Telecommunications: Main distribution and collection systems, configurations and sizes for piping, duct, conduit, power wiring, blowers; diffusers; intakes, large compressors. Clearance reservations for equipment maintenance filter removal, and equipment removal and replacement shall be modeled with the equipment, and sign-off on the adequacy of the space reservations shall be obtained from the facility Chief Engineer.
  4. Architecture + Life Safety Fire Protection: Safe zone and fire suppression pipe location, egress paths and exit distance requirements, equipment, and pipe penetrations.
  5. Medical Equipment + Architecture, MEPF, HVAC, Structural: Medical major equipment positioning and location requirements, medical gases distribution and waste collection, cryogen supply piping for MRI and labs, and cryogen cooling compressors, nurse call systems, public communications, and building controls. This includes major medical equipment adjacencies and shielding barriers, pipes, and venting and air intake locations and other limitations.
  6. Architecture/HVAC + Interiors: Merges shall include ductwork and piping + ceilings and FF&E-6- + HVAC.
  7. Space Validation: There shall be no space gaps. Bounding boxes used to represent room and zone spaces shall match with architectural requirements and data values, and all shall be coordinated with values given in the PFD.
  8. General Model Quality Checking: All walls shall be properly joined to prevent “space leaks” in areas defined by enclosing walls. Bounding boxes shall not conflict.
  9. Security: Security setbacks + structure + site.
  10. Accessibility Compliance: Wheelchair pathways and clearances + structure. (If using Solibri Model Checker or other rules-based model checking software, accessibility compliance can be checked automatically.)

7.10 Virtual Testing and Balancing

The VA requires virtual testing and balancing of the architectural model to support sustainable building systems design and analysis. Room data can be read from the linked architectural model to create mechanical spaces (each space is the same as the room in the architectural model). Multiple spaces are joined to create zones. This data can used to calculate native heating and cooling analysis that is built into the MEP software or exported using gbXML to an external analysis application such as eQuest, Trane/Trace, or DOE based analysis programs. AEs can then bring this data back within the model to check their work. One of the methods is to create a Space/Room schedule that will show calculated air flow vs actual air flow. See figure below. All air flows can be checked for load balance to the terminal box and all the way back to the air handling units. Check with MEP modeling software companies for additional information.

Space Airflow Schedule

-1- Additional space engineering criteria will be added over time.

-2- With the exception of “Army_Cat,” “Navy_Cat,” and “USAF_Cat,” which can be removed.

-3- Mechanical, Electrical, Plumbing, Fire protection (MEPF)

-4- www.wbdg.org/pdfs/cobie_spreadsheet.pdf

-5- Generally this is weekly

-6- Fixtures, Furniture, & Equipment (FFE)

in this section:

Construction Cost Estimating Checklist

How many times have you heard an estimator say …

“ Does anyone have a list or checklist of some sort that you use to make sure you do not miss anything on the drawings? “

Or

“What estimating procedures do you use to help you?”

While 4Clickers’ know the answer is, “ Use e4Clicks Project Estimator! ” , here are my thoughts on a few important items associated with making an accurate construction cost estimate.

1. Everything starts with process and the cost database.

Lack of standardization is the root cause of waste, miscommunication, and errors in construction cost estimating.  In this regard, the value of standardized reference cost databases using Uniformat II and Masterformat95, especially for example the e4Clicks expanded 400,000 RSMeans line item database,  can’t be under-stated. Using a software tool that takes full advantage of, and adds value to the cost databases in concert with you own personal expertise is equally important.  Get away from ad-hoc processes and spreadsheets whenever possible.

CSI Master Format, Uniformat II and RSMeans cost data are extremely valuable as ” checklist” , provide a level of standardization, and help to avoid “missing” items.

2. Scope of Work “Checklist”
Review the Scope and/or Bid Form.  Are there any specific requirements such as price/quantity breakdowns, Unit Prices, Alternates, Bid options, etc.

Review site – existing structures, grading, layout of the project, laydown area, entry & exit to the site and any construction phasing requirements.

What information do you have and do not have to develop the estimate.

3. On Screen Takeoff “Procedures & Checklist”

If you are using electronic drawings, confirming backups, setting & confirming scales ( double check the scale by measuring the longest dimension on the drawings to make sure it’s correct and to know the accuracy) , printing record of document PDFs, etc- Drawing: Drawing Number/Name, Scale, Scale Checked with Dimension.

What is COBIE ?

COBIE is a process framework for collecting llife-cycle building information.  COBIE requires OmniClass,  a CSI data architecture/classification/taxonomy.  (Uniformat is a part of OmniClass).

The COBIE framework can be used with BIM or independent of BIM.

COBIE is intended to allow repair/maintenance/renovation task data to be electronically exchanged.

The Construction Operation Building Information Exchange (COBIE) is an “international standard format” intended to improve the transfer of  design and construction information to the operation and management team.

What is a BIM Strategy ? 3d , 4d , 5D BIM

BIM Strategy Outline  

1. Develop high performance buildings and retrofit existing facilities using sustainable design concepts to achieve a efficient resource and energy use for buildings.

2. Facilitate a collaborative project environment between all stakeholders from project inception throughout the facility lifecycle.

3. Execute coordinated project documents using the 3D modeling and parametric object-based features of BIM

4. Improve system coordination and the execution of design intent in the field to streamline construction processes and minimize change orders.  Associated relevant process include project delivery/procurement processes include IPD , JOC , etc. 

5. Utilize 4D Technology and Process to better manage transition from design to construction and virtually simulate construction processes with various trades to avoid conflicts in the field

6. Utilize 5D technology and processes to develop building life cycle costs projections, and more accurate project cost estimates

7. Incorporate as-built BIMs, including infrastructure and building systems, into Geographical Information System (GIS)

8. Collaborate with Facility Management / Energy Management to incorporate as-built information in to facility capital planning and management tools and software

9. Incorporate submission of the BIM as a requirement  for all projects as applicable.

10. Establish a web-centric technology platform and provide continuous support to incorporate future technologies and to integrate current technologies/applications.

11. Use BIM as Information and Communication tools for all facilities / building constituencies.