BIM, LEAN CONSTRUCTION, & COLLABORATIVE CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY

BIM & LEAN / COLLABORATIVE CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY – If only we could get there!

BEYOND DESIGN, BIM BEGINS WITH 10 STEPS…

  1. Owner competency & leadership
  2. Life-cycle asset management philosophy
  3. Best value procurement
  4. Collaborative construction delivery methods (IPD, JOC, …)
  5. Mutual trust & respect
  6. Common terms, definitions, and data architectures….all in plain English
  7. Shared risk/reward
  8. Monitoring via key performance indicators (KPIs)
  9. Ongoing education, training, & awareness buildling
  10. Continuous improvement

 

 

 

 

 

Building Information Modelling (BIM) is the integration of disparate competencies, business processes, and technologies to accomplish the efficient life-cycle management of the built environment.

Per the above definition, BIM has not moved from theory to reality to any significant extent. Improving facility and infrastructure construction, management, operations, and sustainability is indeed possible, if Owners provide competent leadership.  

Owners must also recognize the value of collaboration, LEAN management methods, and information-based decision-making.   

The fundamental way in which Owners, Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Building Users, and Oversight Groups interact must change.   The issue is not, nor has ever been, shortcomings in technology.  The vacuum is one of lack of change management skills and lack of overall asset life-cycle management competency.

Asset life-cycle management, as demonstrated in the figure below, requires an integration of business areas and competencies.

BIM asset life-cycle competencies

The primary driver is actually the construction delivery method.  It is the construction delivery method that contractually defines roles, responsibilities, timelines, deliverables, relationships, and sets the tone for a project from day one.   The construction delivery method can actually REQUIRE COLLABORATION of all participants, right down to the terms, definitions, and information used.

Thus a collaborative construction delivery CONTRACT and its associated OPERATIONS or EXECUTION MANUAL are the detailed road map to completed a significantly higher percentage (90%+) of quality  renovation, repair, and construction projects on-time and on-budget, and to the satisfaction of ALL participants.

Collaborative construction delivery methods such as Integrated Project Delivery, IPD for major new construction, and Job Order Contracting, JOC, for renovation, repair, maintenance, and minor new construction aren’t new.  The both have proven track records spanning decades.

asset life-cycle model for buildings and infrasructure

OpenJOC win-win

So, why isn’t everyone using collaborative construction delivery methods, and why aren’t 90% of projects delivered on-time and on-budget?   The answer has already been noted… owners are providing the necessary competent leadership, and many players are satisfied with the status quo.

 

 

 

It’s not simply a a learning curve issues,  it’s a culture change.  The multi-party nature, required financial transparency, and sharing of risk and reward is a definite hurdle for many.   Some current owners, contractors, and AE’s, quite simply, won’t be able to make the required transition.

Would it not be nice to stop focusing upon pretty 3D pictures, dated IWMS systems, and other technologies that dictate process and/or embed antagonistic workflows?  As stated previously, technology isn’t the solution, it can however be a crutch, and a problem… if it prevents us from asking the right questions… and dealing with positive change.

 

 

 

 

 

 

My BIM is Your BIM – Owners, Contractors, AEs, Building Users, Oversight Groups, Business Product Manufacturers, Community ….

BIM is the life-cycle management of the built environment supported by digital technology.   It is first and foremost the process of developing and leveraging actionable information (standardized, accurate, transparent) to efficiently manage the total cost of ownership and functional requirements of a built asset (building, infrastructure, etc.).

BIM is NOT rocket science, it is not 3D pretty pictures, it is not all about technology.  BIM first and foremost about early and ongoing collaboration, continuous improvement, and robust life-cycle management process supported with integrated technology and standardized information.

Collaboration construction delivery methods such as Integrated Project Delivery for major new construction, and Job Order Contracting for renovation, repair, sustainability, and minor new construction are important, if not requisite, components of BIM.  Equally important from an Owners perspective is the integration of multiple competencies, business processes, and technologies such as capital planning and management (CPMS) for capital reinvestment strategy, computerized maintenance management (CMMS) for “movable” asset inventory and routine/preventative maintenance, computer aided facility management (CAFM) for space mangement, building automation (BAS) for security/energy, and geographical information (GIS) for rapid locationing.  Forget “integrated workplace management systems” (IWMS), they are attempts at BIM by single vendors.  As one might expect, no single company can be expected to be competent across all knowledge domains and practices.  Through the use of standardized informatoin exchanges, “best in class” technologies will finally be easily integrated as “plug-ins” to a users cloud-based technology platform.

The day is here….   you can wake up or go back to bed…your choice.

Key additional items/areas to consider:

COBie – Construction Operations Building Information Exchange – Organisation and structuring of information. This is information that is essential not only to the design and construction of a built asset, but also its operation and maintenance. Currently focused upon delivering FM information at handover, but rapidly expanding.

OMNICLASS – A standardized information classification system for the built environment.  An integration and expansion of UNIFORMAT, MASTERFORMAT, etc.to incorporate all buildings spaces, equipment, processes, technologies, etc.

Standard Cost Data – Most notable example is RSMeans.   Well researched cost data (material, equipment, labor) and associate construction / facility management sq. ft., assembly, and unit cost information and associated task listings.  Critical for use to “benchmark” and/or “confirm” local processes/projects.  Also standardized using Masterformat.

Job Order Contracting – Collaborative construction delivery method using a standardized unit price book (UPB) based upon RSMeans and/or customized cost information.  Cost are best update annually or quarterly.  Process has been embedded within software to enable cost effective and consistent deployment.  Reducing procurement costs, mitigates change orders, and virtually eliminates legal disputes.

Integrated Project Delivery – Similar to JOC, however best suited for major new construction only.

 

Image

 

 

via http://www.4Clicks.com – Premier cost estimating and efficient project delivery software solutions for JOC, SABER, IDIQ, MATOC, SATOC, MACC, POCA, BOA, BOS … featuring an exclusively enhanced 400,000 line item RSMeans Cost Database, visual estimating/automatic quantity take off ( QTO),  and collaborative contract/project/document management, all in one application.   Our technology is currently serving over 85% of United States Air Force bases and rapidly growing numbers of other DOD and non-DOD (United States Army Corps of Engineers,  Army, GSA, Homeland Security, VA..) federal departments/agencies, as well as state/county/local governments, colleges/universities, healthcare,  and airports/transportation.  RSMeans Strategic Partner

 

Process centric data models are needed for BIM and ….

BIM, the life-cycle management of the built environment supported by digital technology is all about the integration of PEOPLE and PROCESSES and INFORMATION.

The following are MANDATORY on any BIM implementation checklist.  Please add to the list and/or comment!

1. Collaborative construction/project delivery method:  Integrated project delivery (IPD), job order contracting (JOC), private-public partnership (PPP) …

2.  A robust ontology – clearly defined terms, definitions, metrics, benchmarks and their inter-relationships with each other and associated processes.

3.  Linkage for multiple “competencies” and/or “knowledge domains” associate with strategic and capital planning, design, procurement, construction, project management, repair, maintenance, sustainability, operations, and deconstruction/re-use.

 

Examples of domain specific technologies/processes:

CPMS – Capital Planning and Management Systems

CMMS – Computerized Maintenance Management Systems

CAFM – Computer-aided Facility Management

BAS – Building Automation Systems

GIS – Geographical Information Systems

Visualization/QTO – 2d/3d visualization, pattern search,

Procurement/Project Management – IPD, JOC, Cost Estimating, Scheduling ..

 

To date,  ongoing efforts continue relative to the specification of batch and transactional exchanges, upon which this process models can be based.   The concept of a model view defintion (MVD) and or a facility management handover model view defintion (FM MVD) are “pioneering” attempts to add structure to previously disparate and ‘ad-hoc’ methods.   Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) are open and neutral data formats,  and the IFC View Definition and the MVD are synonymous.   The MVD is a subset of IFC intended to provide implementation guidance for classes, attributes, relationships, property sets, quantity sets, etc., however, the issue that these have yet to be adequately described.    Omniclass, for example, is far from complete, and MasterFormat and Uniformat, while both are robust, do not have fully defined relationships.

The FM MVD specifically is an attempt to transform paper-based deliverables into a rich dynamic electronic information repository.  The attempt however will fail without are robust ontology and clear definition of all requisite competencies, information, processes, and their inter-relationships.

COBIe ( Construction-Operations Building information exchange0 and its offshoots LCie, SPARKie, etc.  are schema/data architectures intended to provide an open framework for the exchange and delivery of construction handover information, and eventual life-cycle management of the built environment.  Great care, however, must be takes not to “reinvent the wheel”, or to “automated existing ad-hoc or inefficient AEC practices.    COBIe and its peers MUST be applied and used with fundamental changes in construction delivery methods and standardized ontologies spanning all “competencies”.   In short, keep what is good, through out what is bad, and do so in an open/transparent manner using commonly defined terms, metrics and benchmarks.

While the “COBie model” does fairly well at showing b the relationships among  model entities and the  overall staging of COBie information delivery, it does little to advance fundamental process changes.   It does not clearly define the concept of life-cycle management of the built environment nor COBie’s role in the endeavor.

Planning, design, procurement, construction, repair, maintenance, operations.. can no longer be thought of a discrete.  All are interdependent relative to total cost of ownership and life-cycle management.

BIMF - Building Information Management Framework

via http://www.4Clicks.com – Premier cost estimating and efficient project delivery software solutions for JOC, SABER, IDIQ, MATOC, SATOC, MACC, POCA, BOA, BOS … featuring an exclusively enhanced 400,000 line item RSMeans Cost Database, visual estimating/automatic quantity take off ( QTO),  and collaborative contract/project/document management, all in one application.   Our technology is currently serving over 85% of United States Air Force bases and rapidly growing numbers of other DOD and non-DOD (United States Army Corps of Engineers,  Army, GSA, Homeland Security, VA..) federal departments/agencies, as well as state/county/local governments, colleges/universities, healthcare,  and airports/transportation.  RSMeans Strategic Partner

A Snapshot of International BIM Status and Goals

Year Country Action Reference
2007 Finland Requires IFC BIM in its projects and intends to have integrated model-based operation in future Senate Properties
UK Standard: Collaborative production of architectural, engineering and construction information. Code of Practice. BS 1192:2007
2008 USA Mandatory BIM for government projects GSA; USACE
2010 Norway Requires IFC BIM for new buildings Statsbygg
3 BIM pilot projects running Norwegian Defence Estates Agency
Singapore Establish Centre for construction IT help key agencies and construction firms to kick start BIM Singapore BIM Roadmap 2012
UK Building Information Management – A Standard Framework and Guide to BS 1192 Joint publication of BS 1192:2007 and BSI/CPI
2011 Singapore Work with key agencies on pilot projects Singapore BIM Roadmap 2012
UK Creation of the implementation plan and team to deliver Government Construction Strategy (May)
Evaluate trial projects and recommend (ongoing)
Standard Due: Library Objects for Architecture, Engineering and Construction. Recommended 2D symbols of building elements for use in building information modelling. BS 8541-2
Standard Due: Library Objects for Architecture, Engineering and Construction: Identification and grouping BS 8541-1
Report/Strategy Paper for the Government Construction Client Group (March) BIM Industry Working Group
2012 Korea Public Procurement Service to fully adopt IFC-based open BIM
Singapore BIM as part of public sector building project procurement Singapore BIM Roadmap 2012
Work with key agencies to prepare consultants and contractors who undertake the public sector projects to be BIM ready
BIM Guide – published Singapore BIM Guide
Finland Common BIM Requirements – published buildingSMART Finland
UK Begin phased roll out ot all Government projects (Summer) Government Construction Strategy
Define and mandate expected standard (information set) for Government projects (April)
Identify trial projects in multiple departments to achieve delivery via 3D fully collaborative BIM (July)
COBie-UK-2012 BIM Task Group
Standard due: Library Objects for Architecture, Engineering and Construction: Shape and measurements BS 8541-3
Standard due: Library Objects for Architecture, Engineering and Construction: Attributes for specification and simulation BS 8541-4
Building Information Management Management – Information requirements for the capital delivery phase of construction projects PAS 1192-2:2012
Operational Asset Management – Processes and data for the commissioning, handover, operation and occupation stages BS 1192-3 (not yet published)
2013 Australia Develop and deliver a BIM awareness and promotion program for key government and broader industry participants (July 1) Implementation Strategy – National BIM Initiative Report
Develop and start delivery of BIM training packages to industry practitioners (July 1)
Enable progressive access to an Australian library of generic BIM objects and information for manufactured products that comply with Australian BIM standards (July 1)
Singapore Mandatory Architecture BIM e-Submissions for all new building projects . 20,000 m² Singapore BIM Roadmap 2012
2014 Australia Develop Australian BIM contracts (July 1) Implementation Strategy – National BIM Initative Report
Encourage the inclusion of BIM as a collaborative technology for both professional education and vocational training in the tertiary sector (July 1)
Develop industry protocols for information exchange to underpin BIM and collaborative practice (July 1)
Coordinate activity between relevant sectors of the Australian economy to enable integrated access to land, geospatial and building information (July 1)
Singapore Mandatory Engineering BIM e-Submissions for all new building projects . 20,000 m² Singapore BIM Roadmap 2012
2015 Australia Develop Australian technical codes and standards for BIM (July 1) Implementation Strategy – National BIM Initative Report
Align Australian BIM codes and standards with international equivalents (july 1)
Develop a model-based building regulatory compliance process demonstrator (July 1)
Develop and implementation plan for the transition of Australian regulatory codes and compliance mechanisms to model-based performance based systems (july 1)
Require BIM for Australian Government procurement for built environment projects (July 1)
Encourage State and Territory Governments and the private sector to require BIM for procurement for built environment projects (July 1)
Singapore Mandatory Architecture & Engineering BIM e-Submissions for all new building projects . 5,000 m² Singapore BIM Roadmap 2012
Target = Singapore Construction Industry to use BIM widely
2016 UK Deliver Level 2 BIM (Collaboration) – Introduce a progressive programme of mandated use of fully collaborative Building Information Modelling for Government projects. Level 2 = Managed 3D environment held in separate discipline “BIM(M)” tools with attached data; Commercial data managed by an ERP; Integration on the basis of proprietary interfaces or bespoke middleware could be regarded as “pBIM” (proprietary); the approach may utilise 4D programme data and 5D cost elements. UK Government Construction Strategy & BIM BIM Strategy Paper (2011)
 Source:  Susan Keenliside, 2013-email, via http://www.4Clicks.com
2020 Singapore Realise the vision of a highly integrated and technologically advanced construction sector that will be led by progressive firms and supported by a skilled and competent workforce. Singapore BIM Roadmap 2012

BIM for FM – What is COBie – A Section of Roadmap for Life-cycle Management of the Built Environment

(Source:A report for the Government Construction Client Group Building Information Modelling (BIM) Working Party Strategy Paper March 2011)

via http://www.4Clicks.com – Premier technology solutions for cost estimating and efficient project delivery method implementation – JOC, SABER, IPD, IDIQ, SATOC, MATOC, MACC, POCA, BOA …

What is COBie?

COBie is a vehicle for sharing predominantly non-graphic data about a facility. The primary motivation for the use of COBie is to ensure that the Client as Owner, Operator and Occupier receives the information about the facility in as complete and as useful form as possible. Wherever possible, data should be recorded within COBie. The COBie dataset can additionally act as a guided index to the supplementary documentation, including 2D and 3D information.

 COBie2  was created to provide a means for the faculties industry to communicate information about facilities so that the client can immediately take full and responsible ownership.  It arose from the collaboration of the US Department of State, US Army Corps of Engineers, NASA, and the Veterans Association. In 2008 it was revised as COBie to ensure that it was relevant to facilities  worldwide  and  was  fully  compatible  with  international  standards  for  data  and classification. Adopters of the COBie approach also include public and private owners, University of Indiana, University Southern California, in the UK Vinci Construction Ltd, and in Germany, The State of Bavaria.

 COBie is a non-proprietary format based on a multiple page spread sheet. It is designed to be easily managed by organisations of any size and at any level of IT capability, allowing each of them to contribute efficiently to a single representation of the asset. It requires only information that is (or should be) available anyway, so it does not represent a change in the expected content, only in its usefulness and accessibility. The intent is to not create information that is not already available or produced as part of the existing processes. The aim is to structure and rationalise the information for re-purposing and use downstream.   COBie also acts as an index to other documents. Overall COBie provides traceability and visibility of design, construction and handover decisions to all supply and client side stakeholders.

 

COBie is used for communication, as a means of information exchange between parties, particularly to the customer.  Where automation is not in use, such as in the lower tiers of the supply chain, COBie information can be captured using direct entry into the spread sheet, often using cut-and-paste from existing schedules and documents. Parties including the client can use the COBie format as a primary document for managing the asset. Design development, construction management and asset management applications have had no difficulty in interfacing with the format.

 

COBie comprises sheets that document the facility, the levels (or sectors), spaces and zones that make up the function of the facility. These are then filled with the actual manageable systems and assets and details of their product types.  During construction and installation these are amplified with information about the spares, warranties, and maintenance requirements. Throughout the process additional attributes, issues and documents can be associated to all these items.

 

2 COBie (Construction Operations Building information exchange) was developed by a number of US public agencies to improve the handover process to building owner-operators.

cobie lifecycle

 

 

 

COBie data is accumulated throughout the life cycle

COBie transfers the information needed by the owner/operator to manage their asset efficiently. The principal use-case is therefore the handover of a facility after commissioning of the owner/operator. Typical questions answered by COBie include:

  • What is the design performance of my asset? Energy, rental, quality measures,
  • What is the amount of floor space of estate? Classified by building type.
  • What is the occupancy level of my estate/per building?
  • What is the required plant and equipment maintenance scheduling – preventative and reactive?
  • What is my operational cost expected to be?
  • What is my as-designed energy use cost expected to be? What is my actual energy use? The  use of
COBie in practice has shown that it is not limited and has a more general role of communicating the key information in a structured format. COBie has been found to be useful and efficient in many scenarios, including documenting existing facilities.

1.  The handover of a facility to the owner/operator.

2.  The capture of commissioning and survey information.

3.  The reporting of the designed project ready for tendering.

4.  The coordination of maintenance records of existing infrastructure.

5.  The documentation of issues discovered throughout the life cycle.

6.  The delivery of product data.

7.  The reporting of design intent at the early design stage.

8.  The comparison of briefing requirements against the designed and as built

Cobie sheets

COBie documents the asset in 16 consistent and linked sheets

We anticipate that our application of COBie will develop as the various technologies in the market mature, broadly in line with our “maturity levels model” described in appendix 3. For the majority of the five years of the life of this strategy we anticipate that most of the market will be engaged in or around level 2.  For all deliveries at this level, COBie will be adequate as a transport mechanism but may well require additional development to cope with additional attached data, which some clients may start to wish for collection. There will also be a need to have a more robust system for processing the information as our understanding and needs grow.    For this reason we have identified a stage where we would hold all delivered data in a database to enable these processes. This will need additional guidance as there would be a need to synchronise data, COBie, calculations and proprietary information at the same point in time.

 Our final vision for the delivery of this information will be a fully web enabled transparent (to the user) scenario, based on the Building Smart IFC/IDM and IFD standards.

The model below illustrates this progression, with respect to maturity level.

maturity model

Open BIM Standards – COBIE, OMNICLASS – IFC / COBIE Report 2012

BIM adoption remains a challenge due to the fact that its many supporters don’t focus upon it’s true relevance, the efficient life-cycle management of the built environment.

While any new technology has  barriers to adoption, changing the “status quo”, the fundamental nature of how a business sector does business requires a major event.   The cultural and process changes associated with BIM, namely the need for all stakeholders to collaborate, share information in a transparent manner, and share in risk/reward, remain chasms to be crossed by many/most.    Fortunately, those currently or previously involved with Integrated Project Delivery and Job Order Contracting (the latter a form of IPD specifically targeting renovation, repair, sustainability, and minor new construction) have experience with these “novel” business concepts.  Both IPD and JOC have proven track records and have clearly demonstrated the ability to get more work done on-time and on-budget to the benefit of all involved parties.

A key aspect of BIM, collaboration, can only be efficiently accomplished with a commonly understood and shared taxonomy including terms, definitions, and associated metrics.

So called “open BIM”, such as buildingSMART International’s Industry Foundation Classes (IFCs), are important to enabling collaboration as well as interoperability between BIM software applications.     COBie, a naming convention for facility spaces/components, etc., and its counterparts OMINCLASS, including MASTERFORMAT and UNIFORMAT,  etc. … can be leveraged and generated by IFC appears a goal worth additional focus on a local and global level.   That said, support for COBie, OMNICLASS, IFC, etc. varies and,  far from mainstream.

As noted in the IFC / COBIE Report 2012, BIM’s success depends upon the ability to:

  1. Create model data in a consistent format
  2. Exchange that data in a common language
  3. Interrogate the data intelligently.

There are multiple knowledge domains, technologies, and process involve in the life-cycle management of the built environment, all of which need a common data architecture, taxonomy, set of metrics, etc.

The IFC / COBIE Report 2012 correctly points out that pressing needs remain:

  1. The need for standards

  2. The need for guidance

  3. The need for enhanced IFC import export routines from BIM applications

  4. The need for agreed descriptions of who requires what data and when

  5. The need for an improved audit trail to allow greater confidence in collaboration.

Also, and I paraphrase / embellish…

  1. “Enforcement” of IFC by buildSmartalliance and all BIM “proponents”  is required.
  2. Domain experts must leveraged and queried to deliver structured data templates accordingly.  The industry needs well defined model view definition for each COBie data drop. From this can come clear guidance on the “level of detail” required at each COBie data drop. This will give a shared understanding of what information is required from and by whom and at what stage.  For example needs of Facilities Managers are required to inform the content of the COBie data drops. Facility management must be considered as early as the briefing process.
  3. Weaknesses in the IFC import /export processes exist in current software product implementation. These weaknesses make manual checking necessary and reduce confidence.  Improvement  is vital here.
  4. While IFC can be used when generating COBie data, people will use whatever works and is available. The market requires.  complete flexibility to choose what systems they use. Innovation should not be stifled by mandating a process to achieve the required data.
  5. COBIE is far from complete, but a good starting point.
  6.  Microsoft Excel  provides a view of the structured info of COBie data and one way 0f reporting data, however, in NOT a good authoring tool, nor does it support hierarchal relational data schema.

IFC_COBie-Report-2012

BIG DATA = BIM
BIG DATA = BIM

 

 

The “I” in BIM, OMNICLASS, and the Criticality of Getting it RIGHT…. Now!

In order to efficiently manage the life-cycle of the build environment, robust process, terms, and decision support tools are required that deal with physical and functional conditions, costs, priorities, risks, etc.

Business Case –  The classification and identification of equipment assets within a facility has to-date typically been accomplished through the use of internally developed legacy systems that do not integrate with other similar systems in use in other facilities, or new or existing technologies. Without an industry standard, users have been unable to cross reference data between organizations, agencies, industry, disciplines, and software solutions, creating inaccuracies and inefficiencies that have a major impact on effective maintenance, operations, and management of assets and facilities. There are shortcomings in all existing industry standards that define or classify objects in a way that allows facility life cycle capture of data. – Inter-agency Federal Asset Classification Team (IFACT)

The ability to define a “thing”, and recall that “thing”, and be able to discuss that “thing”, and all of its attributes, and track it’s changes…both planned, and unplanned, is critical.   Yet, the capability is NOT present at this time.    Here’s a short list of what is holding us back.   The good news is that it’s not “rocket science”.    The bad news is that is will REQUIRE SIGNIFICANT CULTURAL CHANGE with the Architectural, Engineering, Construction, Operations, and Owners sector.

  1. Faceted vs. Hierarchical Data Structures / Architectures
  2. Object-oriented technology to support Faceted and/or Hybrid classifications
  3. Collaborative, cloud-based systems that are multi-language, multi-currency, secure, fast, and never delete information.
  4. A life-cycle vs. first cost mentality/approach for planning, decision-making, and resource allocation.

OMNICLASS and cloud-computing will enable BIM leap to the next level, that is…. life-cycle management of the built environment, vs. pretty pictures.

Here’s some related work on the Government side:

A National Building Information Model Standard Project Fact Sheet Inter-agency Federal Asset Classification Team
(IFACT) –   The National Building Information Model Standard (NBIMS) is a set of interoperable standards for exchange of facility and infrastructure data through the life-cycle of a project. NBIMS is a joint project coordinated by National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS) in conjunction with the buildingSMART Alliance (bSA) and many other facilities-related associations and software companies.

Results to Date

  • Progress towards complete revision of OmniClass Table 23 – Products
  • Progress towards compiling new abbreviations to submit to the United States National CAD Standard® consensus process.
  • Construction Specification Institute is the key authoring authority on project.
  • Participating Agencies: General Services Administration, Department of Veteran Affairs, Department of State, Department of Homeland Security
  • Future Applications – Enhancements to OmniClass and the United States National CAD Standard® will allow a higher degree of data integration for all related software solutions and facility management systems.
BIG DATA = BIM
BIG DATA = BIM

via http://www.4Clicks.com – via 4Clicks.com – Premier cost estimating and efficient project delivery software featuring visual estimating, best representation of RSMeans Cost Data, contact, project and document management, for facility renovation, repair, sustainability, and minor new construction : JOC, SABER, IDIQ, IPD, SATOC, MATOC, BOCA, BOA, ….

Building Innovation 2013 Conference & Expo – Proceedings / Presentations – OnLine

Many of the excellent presentations at the Building Innovation 2013 Conference & Expo are available on-line at http://www.nibs.org/?page=conference

buildingSMART alliance Conference Integrating BIM: Moving the Industry Forward – LINK

FEDCon® – The Annual Market Outlook on Federal Construction – LINK

Sustainable Buildings Industry Council Symposium – Fostering Innovation to go Beyond GreenTM – LINK

Innovative Technology Demonstrations — Including the buildingSMART Challenge, Construction Operations Building information exchange (COBie) Calculator and Specifiers Properties information exchange (SPie) Catalog, and introducing information exchanges for Building Programming (BPie), HVAC (HVACie), Electrical Systems (SPARKie), Building Automation Modeling (BAMie) and Water Systems (WSie).  – LINK

BIM Academic Education Symposium Setting the Course for a BIM Educational Strategy – LINK

CULTURE, TECHNOLOGY/SOCIAL MEDIA & BIM

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BIM vs Information Silos

 BIM is not about software or technology but about CULTURE CHANGE and CHANGE MANAGEMENT.

BIM is about simplifying and adding visibility to the life-cycle management of the built environment.  You are either “on-board” or “not”.  It’s up to you.

BIM and FM are synonymous.  Unfortunately there are very few instances of BIM.

The biggest mistake made by most people new to BIM is to assume that BIM is all about technology, and so focus all their efforts on mastering the technology rather than considering the impact that the application of this technology will have on the processes among Owners, AEs, Contractors, Subs, Business Product and Service Providers.

IFMA BIM Lifecycle Operations Community of Practice (BIMLO COP) Kickoff Meeting Video – http://www.gosee.tv/bimlco/

BIM requirements:

  1. Organizational Commitment
  2. Collaborative, Efficient Project Delivery Methods (IPD- Integrated Project Delivery, JOC – Job Order Contracting …)
  3. Standards (OMNICLASS, COBie, IFC), Common Terms, Definitions, Metrics, Cost Data (Standardized Cost Data, example-RSMeans)
  4.  Life-cycle Information
  5.  Open digital technology supporting the above
  6.  Continuous Training and Improvement

via http://www.4Clicks.com – Premier software and services for construction cost estimating and efficient project delivery – IPD, JOC, SABER, IDIQ, SATOC, MATOC, MACC, POCA, BOA…featuring the best representation of RSMeans Cost Data, exclusively enhanced 400,000 line item database.

BIG DATA, BIM, Life-cycle Management of the Built Environment

COBIE – BIM – Life-cycle Facility Managment

After a 3 month period of international review, the COBie Guide has just been published on the buildingSMART alliance website.  The COBie Guide can be considered the “commentary” to the COBie information standard “code”.  The Guide provides enforceable quality standards for the delivery of COBie data. To obtain a copy click COBie_Guide_-.

This version of the COBie Guide will be submitted for United States National BIM Standard balloting in the next round.  The Guide is organized to allow the specification of regional and client customization. As a result, it is hoped, that this document can be applied to accelerate the already rapid use of COBie world-wide. – Bill East, US Army October 9. 2012 – via FMOC

The quality standards identified in this Guide will be built into the bimserver.org COBie checking routines to provide anyone using COBie a free quality control tool.

The COBie Guide: a commentary to the NBIMS-US COBie standard
by Dr. Bill East, PhD, PE, F.ASCE1, Mariangelica Carrasquillo-Mangual 2
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The Construction-Operations Building information exchange (COBie) format is the international standard for the exchange of information about managed facility assets. COBie does not add new requirements to contracts; it simply changes the format of existing deliverables from paper documents and proprietary formats, to an open, international standard format.
While COBie provides the format for the exchange of required asset information, it does not provide details on what information is to be provided when, and by whom. This Guide provides best-practice guidelines for these requirements. This Guide can be considered the “commentary” that accompanies the COBie format specification. To use this guide, customizations reflecting regional practices, specialized project types, and client’s requirements should be documented in Appendix A. The correct application of the COBie Guide may then be reference directly in appropriate specifications.
As of 2012 over twenty commercial software products support COBie. These products cover the entire facility life-cycle from planning, design, construction, commissioning to operations, maintenance, and space management. Software implementers will find the information in Appendix B helpful for low-level mapping of required properties.

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