STATEMENT OF KEVIN KAMPSCHROER DIRECTOR OFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH-PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGS OFFICE OF GOVERNMENTWIDE POLICY U.S. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON INVESTIGATIONS AND OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ON SCIENCE, SPACE, AND TECHNOLOGY U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

What is the Green Building Certification System?    What is Federal government’s role in using sound science and peer-reviewed studies to evaluate and implement advanced building technologies?

Congress has set statutory goals for improvements in performance – from reducing energy and water intensity across the Federal government’s real property inventory  relative pursuing net-zero energy buildings…. but is any project truly being made?

Executive Orders in two successive Administrations also have been issued to accomplish sustainability targets, but is anything truly being done in a productive manner?

The GSA is chartered to lead high performance building efforts including Congressionally-mandated review of green building certification systems.

As the GSA’s success is measured in how well it aids other agencies in their effectiveness, it must address all core aspects of sustainability initiatives including: efficient project delivery methods (integrated project delivery – IPD and job order contracting – JOC), capital planning and management,  and the disposal of Federal assets.

Congress created the  Office of Federal High Performance Green Buildings – OFHPGB (Chartered in December 2007 under Section 436 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) ) to enable and enhance Federal leadership in the field of large scale sustainable real property portfolio policy, management and operations.

Goals established in 2007 include:

Energy managers to complete annual comprehensive energy and water evaluations for approximately 25 percent of covered facilities, with each facility evaluated at least once every 4 years;

30 percent of hot water demand in new Federal buildings and major renovations be met with solar hot water equipment provided it is life-cycle cost effective;

Agencies use energy-efficient lighting fixtures and bulbs in Federal buildings;

Sustainable design principles to be applied to new Federal buildings and major renovations of Federal buildings;

Aggressive fossil fuel-generated energy reductions for new Federal buildings and major renovations of Federal buildings, phased-in through 2030, and

Agencies reduce total energy consumption per gross square foot in their new and existing Federal buildings by 30 percent from a FY2003 baseline by FY2015.

In 2009, the President signed Executive Order 13514 – Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic Performance which added the following:

Reduce potable water intensity by 26 percent in FY2020 compared to FY2007;

Reduce industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use 2 percent annually, leading to a 20 percent reduction by FY2020 compared to FY2010;

Ensure all new Federal buildings entering the design phase in 2020 or later be designed to achieve net zero energy by 2030, and

Have at least 15 percent of existing buildings and leases meet the Guiding Principles for Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings by 2015 with continued progress towards 100 percent.

To this date one might argue that little has been done.  For example the GSA and most, if not all other Federal Government non-DOD Departement and Agencies don’t even have a standardized job order contracting (JOC) program to enable efficient implementation of sustainability projects.

The DOD however, especially the Air Force has full documented and working JOC programs (called SABER in the Air Force), and the Army has made some progress as well.

Thus in summary, the GSA is still in the mode of “Putting the tools together”, to allow the Federal government to make strides in achieving the aggressive performance goals set by Congress and pursued by the Administration.

The question however is, do we have the time to wait?

 

 

BIM – Energy Efficiency Tied to Real Estate / Real Property Sales – The Importance of High Performance Buildings vs. ROI

Due diligence relative to the energy efficiency of commercial is not only important relative to building resale and ROI, but is becoming mandated in several states, counties, and cities.   For example, use of the new ASTM (American Society for Testing and Materials) Standard E-2797-11, Standard Practice for Building Energy Performance Assessment for a Building Involved in a Real Estate Transaction, is required in several states and cities and under consideration in a growing number of others. Federal legislation is sure to follow.

Energy-efficient buildings cost less to operate, have higher net operating income (NOI), better asset value, and are more attractive to tenants.   Property owners and lessors can leverage higher performing buildings to attract and retain tenants that recognize that these buildings  have lower utility and operating costs.  In many cases leanders are provided a Pro Forma with a specific aline item for utilities/energy costs as a component of building operating costs.  Savvy buyers will also consider energy usage when comparing similar properties.

The Role of BIM, JOC, and IPD in Sustainability

Creating a baseline energy audit isalso  a “best practice” relative to enabling better short and longer term planning for facility renovation, repair, and maintenance projects.

It is likely that more and more facility condition assessments (FCAs) will include energy audits are a required, standardized component.

 In summary, standards and best practices relative to energy and condition audits are an important component of BIM ( Building Information Modeling ).  Robust practices for collection, assembly, evaluation, and reporting required information are key to BIM as are efficient renovation and repair contstruction methods such as JOC – Job Order Contracting, and IPD – Integrated Project Delivery.

Consistency and transparency in data collection, project evaluation, costing, and project managemetn are requirements in order to efficiently deliver quality  improvement project on time and on budget. 

via www.4clicks.com Premier Provider of Software for Cost Estimating and Efficient Project Management for JOC, IPD, SABER, IDIQ, SATOC, MATOC, MACC, POCA, BOA ….

Obama Missing the Point on Sustainability?

President Obama’s  State of the Union Address calls for 80% clean power by 2035, but…  WHAT ABOUT ENERGY CONSERVATION!!!!

Clean energy is great, but likely a pipe dream.  Furthermore, none of the “renewable” energy sources will meet current demands and/or be deployable by 2035.

We need to get serious about implementing energy conservation measures and associated facility system upgrades.   It is no secret that existing building energy use can be reduced 30% to 50% by upgrading systems and adopting better utilization practices.

The real issues is that appropriate incentives and efficient  transparent project delivery methods are not being used.

The combination of objective facility assessments with efficient project delivery methods such as JOC – Job Order Contracting, and IPD – Integrated Project Design, associated mandates and financial incentives is sorely needed!

Time to stop talking and start acting?

 

 

Buildings and Their Impact Upon The Environment

Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC)

Buildings responsible for over one-third of North America’s CO2 emissions

Report prescribes policies to slash buildings’ energy use

 

While this report tends to focus upon new buildings, and thus no directly address the major issue – existing buildings, a lot of the information is valuable.  Using existing methods and technologies it is possible to routinely reduce energy usage of existing buildings by 30, 40, or even 50 percent – should mandates, efficient construction delivery methods, such as JOC and IPD, and proven facility condition assessment/capital planning techniques be employed. – Blog Author

 

Promoting the green design, construction, renovation and operation of buildings could cut North American greenhouse gas emissions that are fuelling climate change more deeply, quickly and cheaply than any other available measure, according to the 2008 report issued by the trinational Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC).

North America’s buildings cause the annual release of more than 2,200 megatons of CO2 into the atmosphere, about 35 percent of the continent’s total.

Rapid market uptake of currently available and emerging advanced energy-saving technologies could result in over 1,700 fewer megatons of CO2 emissions in 2030, compared to projected emissions that year following a business-as-usual approach.

 

The report, Green Building in North America: Opportunities and Challenges, is the result of a two-year study by the CEC Secretariat. It was prepared with advice from an international advisory group of prominent developers and architects, sustainability and energy experts, real estate appraisers and brokers, together with local and national government representatives.

Despite proven environmental, economic and health benefits, green building today accounts for a only small fraction of new home and commercial building construction—just two percent of the new non-residential building market, less than half of one percent of the residential market in the United States and Canada, and less than that in Mexico.

“Improving our built environment is probably the single greatest opportunity to protect and enhance the natural environment. This report is a blueprint for dramatic environmental progress throughout North America—mostly using the tools and technology we have on hand today,” says CEC Executive Director Adrián Vázquez.

Even with rapid growth projected in the green building market across all three countries, the report says public and private sectors must embrace substantial changes to the planning, development and financing of commercial and residential buildings to overcome what it says are significant barriers to the widespread adoption of high-performance buildings throughout North America.

Report authors describe a number of disincentives to green building to be overcome. For example, how to encourage developers to incur the marginal cost of green building features when the long-term energy-saving benefits will be passed on to the new owners or tenants, and recommends ways to accelerate the market uptake of green building and make it the standard practice for all new construction and renovation of existing buildings in North America. Among its recommendations, the report calls upon North American government, industry and nongovernmental leaders to:

  • Create national, multi-stakeholder task forces charged with achieving a vision for green building in North America;
  • Support the creation of a North American set of principles and planning tools for green building;
  • Set clear targets to achieve the most rapid possible adoption of green building in North America, including aggressive targets for carbon-neutral or net zero-energy buildings, together with performance monitoring to track progress towards these targets;
  • Enhance ongoing or new support for green building, including efforts to promote private sector investment and proper valuation methods; and
  • Increase knowledge of green building through research and development, capacity building, and the use of labels and disclosures on green building performance.

The recommendations complement ongoing efforts by federal, state/provincial and local governments as well as industry and trade associations and nongovernmental organizations.

The CEC study notes several government and industry initiatives that promote aggressive energy performance improvements in the building sector. One study completed for the report signals the potential of green building to yield tremendous energy improvements and greenhouse gas emissions reductions in the building sector by 2030, and suggests a path toward zero net-energy and carbon-neutral buildings.


In Canada, buildings are responsible for:

  • 33 percent of total energy use;
  • 12 percent of non-industrial water consumption;
  • 50 percent of natural resource consumption;
  • 35 percent of greenhouse gas emissions;
  • 10 percent of airborne particulate production; and
  • 25 percent of landfill waste generation.

In Mexico, buildings are responsible for:

  • 17 percent of total energy use;
  • 5 percent of potable water consumption;
  • 25 percent of total electricity consumption;
  • 20 percent of all carbon dioxide emissions; and
  • 20 percent of the waste generated.

In the United States, buildings account for:

  • 40 percent of total energy use;
  • 12 percent of the total water consumption;
  • 68 percent of total electricity consumption;
  • 38 percent of total carbon dioxide emissions; and
  • 60 percent of total non-industrial waste generation.

In Canada, more than 123,000 new single-family homes were built in 2006. In the United States, an average of 1.24 million single-family homes is built every year. Mexico projects an average of 1 million new homes every year for the next 25 years.

Hundreds of coal-fired power plants, a key source of greenhouse gas emissions, are currently on the drawing boards in the United States. According to one report, 76 percent of the energy produced by these plants will go to operate buildings.

According to the report, Canada’s residential building sector is responsible for approximately 80 megatons of CO2 emissions annually and its commercial building sector for approximately 69 megatons of CO2.

In the United States, residential buildings account for approximately 1,210 megatons of CO2 per year while commercial buildings are responsible for approximately 1,020 megatons of CO2.

In Mexico, residential buildings account for approximately 42 megatons of CO2 emissions annually, while commercial buildings are responsible for approximately 20 megatons of CO2.

In 2001, the carbon associated with energy services to United States buildings alone constituted 8 percent of total global emissions of CO2, equal to all emissions from Japan and the United Kingdom combined.

Beyond individual buildings, poor patterns of building development often lead to congestion and inefficient use of land, resulting in greater energy consumption and travel time, loss of productivity, polluted runoff to surface water and wastewater treatment systems, loss of agricultural lands, fragmented habitats, and fiscal stress to local communities. Two case studies from Toronto indicate that residents of sprawling neighborhoods tend to emit more greenhouse gases per person and suffer more traffic fatalities.

Buildings contribute significantly to the use of key resources such as energy and water. For instance, in the United States, building operations consume 12 percent of fresh water supplies. In Canada, the building sector consumes half of all natural resources used and generates a quarter of all landfill waste. Worldwide, buildings consume around 40 percent of all raw materials.

Urban water run-off is another important building-related impact. Buildings, and transportation infrastructure that serve them, replace natural surfaces with impermeable materials, typically creating runoff that washes pollutants and sediments into surface water. Urban runoff is the fourth-leading cause of impairment of rivers, third-leading for lakes, and second for estuaries in the United States, and a significant problem in many parts of Mexico and Canada as well. In Mexico City, most rainwater flows on impermeable surfaces to the city drainage system; only a small proportion (11 percent) is recharged into the aquifer, causing a greater dependence on neighboring basins and increasing the risk of flooding.

In the United States, the annual cost of building-related sickness is estimated to be $58 billion. According to researchers, green building has the potential to generate an additional $200 billion annually in worker performance in the United States by creating offices with better indoor air.

Studies show that the cost premium to deliver sustainable properties to the market has declined considerably in recent years, and that experienced teams are delivering them at costs competitive with conventional buildings.

Governments at all levels are working to address obstacles to the uptake of green building through the integrated use of building codes; zoning regulations; tax-based incentives; and preferential treatment for green developers (such as fast-track permitting). In addition, green building practices are also being spurred by demand offset programs (in which a developer reduces energy and water demand as a condition of permitting); preferred purchasing; tax shifting; and government-supported research, development, and educational programs.

The US green building industry—almost non-existent a decade ago—is now worth upwards of $12 billion.

F

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The report was produced by the Secretariat of the CEC, prepared under Article 13 of the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC) and is not intended to reflect the views of the Parties to that agreement. Information for the report came from background reports prepared by independent experts and from two public meetings. The report and associated background reports, along with a portfolio of selected green buildings in Canada, Mexico and the United States, will be available to the public on 13 March 2008, at .

The CEC was established by Canada, Mexico and the United States to build cooperation among the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) partners in implementing NAAEC, the environmental side accord to NAFTA. The CEC addresses environmental issues of continental concern, with particular attention to the environmental challenges and opportunities presented by continent-wide free trade.

Contacts:

Mr. Eduardo Viadas
Commission for Environmental Cooperation
Tel: 1-514-350-4331
E-mail: eviadas@cec.org

Mr. Terry Collins
Tel: 1-416-538-8712, 1-416-878-8712
E-mail: terrycollins@rogers.com

Existing Buildings – Sustainability Resources – Meeting 2030 Guidelines

Online Resources:

Advanced Buildings

Advanced Buildings was developed by the New Buildings Institute.  It is a collection of technical resources and training opportunities useful to the design and operation of high performance buildings.  Resources include a database of high performance buildings that use less than 50% of the energy of conventional buildings http://www.advancedbuildings.net/

American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE)

The ACEEE has promoted energy efficiency practices and policies for nearly 30 years. Titles of its numerous technical papers and conference proceedings, including their semi-annual Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings are all listed on the site along with purchasing information. http://www.aceee.org  American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) ASHRAE is a professional organization dedicated to the creation and promotion of quality-based standard practices in the HVAC&R industry.  Members have access to ASHRAE technical articles and conference papers.  Anyone can browse abstracts of ASHRAE’s numerous books, journal articles and other technical publications that are available for purchase.      http://www.ashrae.org

Architecture 2030 Challenge

This initiative has established performance standards for buildings to achieve by the year 2030.  The standards include significant reductions in green house gases, energy consumption, and the use of fossil fuel.  Guidelines for Implementation of these standards are provided here.  http://www.architecture2030.org/2030_challenge/index.html

ASHRAE Advanced Energy Design Guides

ASHRAE developed design guides for six building types; healthcare, offices, lodging, schools, retail, and warehouses.  The goal of these guides is to provide users with the tools to achieve building energy savings that are 30% above the savings of buildings that meet the minimum requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 1999.  http://www.ashrae.org/publications/page/1604

Assessment of the Technical Potential for Achieving Net Zero-Energy Buildings in the Commercial Sector

This National Renewable Energy Laboratory paper reports on the findings from their research to assess the potential for zero-energy building technologies and practices to reduce energy consumption in the commercial building sector. http://www.nrel.gov/docs/fy08osti/41957.pdf

Energy Efficiency Class Resources

Buildings Energy Data Book, 2009 The Department of Energy’s Buildings Energy Data Book is updated annually.  This publication contains statistics on residential and commercial building energy consumption in the US.  The Data Book also includes characteristics and efficiencies of common commercial equipment.  http://buildingsdatabook.eere.energy.gov/

BuildingGreen

BuildingGreen is a good resource for information on environmentally friendly products, building design and operation practices.  This site provides abstracts of all articles from Environmental Building News, plus full text of selected articles, product reviews, GreenSpec® product information service, and resource lists on green building topics. http://www.buildinggreen.com

California Energy Commission.  Title 24 Energy Efficiency Standards

The CEC’s web site provides access to the new Title 24 Standards, Residential and Nonresidential Compliance Manuals, Alternative Calculation Manuals, and the 2008 Reference Appendices.  Links are also provided for information about Computer Compliance Software and HERS regulations. http://www.energy.ca.gov/title24/2008standards/

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS)

CBECS is a sample survey of U.S. commercial buildings’ energy characteristics that is published every 4 years by the Energy Information Administration.  The survey includes data on buildings’ energy consumption, energy expenditures, end-use equipment, and energy sources. http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cbecs/

Consortium for Energy Efficiency (CEE)

CEE promotes the manufacture and acquisition of energy efficient products and services for homes and businesses.  Topics include lighting, HVAC, and refrigeration equipment.  Efficiency specifications, product information, qualifying equipment lists, and FAQs on commercial equipment are available on this site. http://www.cee1.org

DOE Zero Energy Buildings Database

This database features profiles of eight zero energy commercial buildings.  Each profile contains an overview and information about the process, financing, land use, site, energy use, materials, indoor environment, ratings, and lessons learned. http://zeb.buildinggreen.com/

ENERGY STAR.

Benchmarking The EPA’s energy performance rating system has tools and resources for benchmarking the energy performance of buildings.  Tools include Portfolio Manager and the Benchmarking Starter Kit. http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfm?c=eeps_guidebook.eeps_guidebook-2-benchmarking

ENERGY STAR Building Upgrade Manual

This manual is a guide to planning and implementing energy saving building upgrades.  Individual chapters cover heating and cooling, lighting, air distribution, load reduction and retrocommissioning.  http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfmc=business.bus_upgrade_manual  Flex Your Power.

Commercial Sector: Upgrade Your Facility

The Commercial Sector of this site includes steps and tools for upgrading your facility, plus a Best Practices Guide for improving the energy efficiency of office buildings and lowering operating costs.  The guide also includes case studies. http://www.fypower.org/com/upgrade.html

Energy Efficiency Class Resources

Green Building Research Center (GBRC).  University of California, Berkeley The GBRC was created to promote sustainable building design and operation on the Berkeley campus.  The Best Practices case studies feature the top design and retrofit performers in energy efficiency, sustainability, innovation, and cost-effectiveness throughout the UC/CSU/CCC community.  http://www.greenbuildings.berkeley.edu/index.htm

LEED for Existing Buildings

Operations & Maintenance LEED for Existing Buildings Rating System helps building owners and operators measure their existing operations and improvements to their practices.  This system includes Operations & Maintenance Rating System, Checklist, and Reference Guide.  These publications can be downloaded from this site. http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspx?CMSPageID=221

LEED® Green Building Rating System

This newest version of LEED launched in April 2009.  Learn about the components of this updated building rating system for new construction and major renovations, opportunities for LEED training, webcasts, and LEED credentials here.  The LEED Reference Guides can be downloaded or ordered in hard copy from this USGBC site.  Project Profiles and Case Studies can be found under the Resources navigation tab.  http://www.usgbc.org/DisplayPage.aspxCMSPageID=1970

Commissioning and Retrocommissioning  California Commissioning Collaborative

The California Commissioning Collaborative is a group of government, utility, and building service professionals organized to develop and promote commissioning practices in the California.  The CCC site includes over 40 case studies, and has recently added a Library to its Resources that contains articles, white papers, guides, and sample commissioning documents. http://www.cacx.org

Cost-Effectiveness of Commercial-Buildings Commissioning.

Evan Mills et al. This December 2004 paper is a comprehensive compilation and analysis of commissioning data from over 200 commercial buildings throughout the United States.  The paper examines commissioning data from both existing and new buildings.  http://eetd.lbl.gov/emills/PUBS/Cx-Costs-Benefits.html  Green California.

Commissioning and Retro-Commissioning Buildings

California’s initiative for green buildings includes the commissioning and retrocommissioning process.  This section describes the commissioning and retrocommissioning process and provides access to many useful guidelines, reports, and tools.  Links to related Green California sites are also provided. http://www.green.ca.gov/CommissioningGuidelines/default.htm

A Practical Guide for Commissioning Existing Buildings

Prepared by the staffs of Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. and Oakridge National Laboratory, this guide covers the benefits and methodologies of retrocommissioning projects.  http://www.osti.gov/bridge/product.biblio.jsposti_id=15043

Incentives  Commercial Building Tax Deduction Coalition

This coalition presents an overview of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and provides answers to some frequently asked questions.  Links to related rules and legislative updates are also available on this site.  http://www.efficientbuildings.org

Energy Efficiency Class Resources

Commercial Lighting Tax Deduction Find details on the tax deductions available for lighting upgrades here.  A Guide to the Energy Efficient Commercial Buildings Deduction, resources to assist with implementing the deduction, information about lighting technologies, ASHRAE 90.1, and case studies are provided.  http://www.lightingtaxdeduction.org/

DSIRE

Database of State Incentives for Renewables & Efficiency DSIRE provides information about financial incentives for renewable energy and energy efficiency projects throughout the United States.  Information is provided on state, local, utility, and federal programs and is organized by state.  Click on the state of California to view information about available incentives.  http://www.dsireusa.org

Energy Star® for Business Improvement.

Tools and Resources This is the Energy Star program’s gateway to documents and software for measuring, managing, and improving business energy usage and financial performance. Energy Star also provides a directory for locating Energy Star labeled energy efficient products and services. http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfmc=tools_resources.bus_energy_management_tools_resources  ENERGY STAR.

Tax Deductions for Commercial Buildings.

The Energy Policy Act of 2005 provides tax deductions to building owners and designers for energy saving measures included in new or existing commercial buildings.  This site provides links to resources that provide details about these deductions.  http://www.energystar.gov/index.cfmc=tax_credits.tx_comm_buildings

Tax Incentives Assistance Project (TIAP)

TIAP provides tax incentive information to homeowners, businesses, builders and manufacturers.  Some of the information provided includes an overview of tax incentives, credit amounts, and descriptions of eligible projects. http://www.energytaxincentives.org

PG&E Resources:  Business Tools

PG&E Business Tools include Energy Usage, Billing History and Rate Comparison Tools. http://www.pge.com/mybusiness/myaccount/analysis/

Demand Response Program

Information on the various Demand Response programs offered by PG&E can be found here. http://www.pge.com/mybusiness/energysavingsrebates/demandresponse/

Large Business Energy Management Solutions

Here you will find information about cash rebates and incentives for replacing existing equipment with new energy efficient technologies or purchasing new equipment.  Design assistance for a new facility and system process is also available.  http://www.pge.com/mybusiness/energysavingsrebates/incentivesbyindustry/

Small and Medium Businesses Energy Management Solutions

Information about rebates, incentives, and resources available for your retrofit or new construction project can be found here.  http://www.pge.com/mybusiness/energysavingsrebates/smallmediumbusiness/

 

ASHRAE GreenGuide: The Design, Construction, and Operation of Sustainable Buildings, 2 nd  ed.  ASHRAE, 2006 ‰

Energy Standard for Buildings except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.  ASHRAE/ANSI Standard 90.1-2007 ‰

Heating, Cooling, Lighting: Sustainable Design Methods for Architects.  Norbert Lechner.  Wiley, 2008 ‰

LEED for Existing Buildings. Version 2.0.  Reference Guide.  USGBC, 2006 ‰

Mechanical and Electrical Equipment for Buildings, 10 th  ed. Benjamin Stein, ed.  Wiley, 2006 ‰

Retrocommissioining:  Program Strategies to Capture Energy Savings in Existing Buildings.  Jennifer Thorne.  ACEEE, 2003

Journals  ‰

Building and Environment ‰

Consulting-Specifying Engineer ‰

Energy and Buildings ‰

Environmental Design + Construction (ED +C) Magazine ‰

High Performance Buildings ‰

HPAC Engineering Magazine

Other Print Resources:  ‰

Energy Conservation in Existing Buildings.  ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 100-2006.  ASHRAE, 2006 ‰

Energy Efficiency Guide for Existing Commercial Buildings: The Business Case for Building Owners and Managers.  ASHRAE, 2009

OFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGS

US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICE
AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLAN
OFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGS
US GSA
via http://www.4clicks.com – construction cost estimating and project management software for JOC – SABER – SATOC – MATOC – MACC – BOA – POCA – IDIQ
Page 1 of 6
a. Objectives: Program Purpose: The Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings provides high-performance green building information and disseminates practices, technologies and research results through outreach, education, and the provision of technical assistance government-wide. The Office was established by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (“EISA”, Public Law 110-140) to:
(1) coordinate the activities of the Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings with the activities of the DOE Office of Commercial High-Performance Green Buildings;
(2) ensure full coordination of high-performance green building information and activities within the General Services Administration and all relevant agencies;
(3) establish a senior-level Federal Green Building Advisory Committee, which shall provide advice and recommendations for high-performance green buildings;
(4) identify and reassess improved or higher rating standards recommended by the Advisory Committee;
(5) ensure full coordination, dissemination of information regarding, and promotion of the results of research and development information relating to Federal high-performance green building initiatives;
(6) identify and develop Federal high-performance green building standards for all types of Federal facilities;
(7) establish green practices that can be used throughout the life of a Federal facility;
(8) review and analyze current Federal budget practices and life-cycle costing issues, and make recommendations to support high-performance green buildings; and
(9) identify opportunities to demonstrate innovative and emerging green building technologies and concepts.
“High-Performance Green Buildings” are defined as buildings that, as compared to similar buildings: (1) Reduce energy, water, and material resource use;
Page 2 of 6
(2) Improve indoor environmental quality, including reducing indoor pollution, improving thermal comfort, and improving lighting and acoustic environments that affect occupant health and productivity; (3) Reduce negative impacts on the environment throughout the life-cycle of the building, including air and water pollution and waste generation;
(4) Increase the use of environmentally preferable products, including bio-based, recycled content and nontoxic products with lower life-cycle impacts;
(5) Increase reuse and recycling opportunities;
(6) Integrate systems in the building;
(7) Reduce the environmental and energy impacts of transportation through building location and site design that support a full range of transportation choices for users of the building; and
(8) Consider indoor and outdoor effects of the building on human health and the environment, including—
(i) Improvements in worker productivity;
(ii) The life-cycle impacts of building materials and operations; and
(iii) Other, appropriate factors.
Public Benefit: This Office supports the stated goals of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act by providing technical standards, measurement tools, and government-wide leadership necessary to support the agencies charged with delivering high-performance green Federal buildings under the Act.
The government-wide infrastructure investments supported by the standards and activities of the Office will benefit the public by reducing carbon emissions, reducing consumption of energy and water, increasing reliance on renewable energy in Federal buildings and minimizing related impacts on human health and the environment.
b. Activities: The Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings: (1) promotes and coordinates high-performance green building information and activities throughout the Federal government,
(2) serves as the Federal government’s green building advocate, and (3) develops standards and green practices for all types of Federal facilities.
\
Current activities of the Office include: • Coordinating activities with the Department of Energy Office of Commercial High-Performance Green Buildings; • Coordinating with the Interagency Sustainability Working Group on the development of a tracking system for compliance with the Guiding Principles for High-Performance and Sustainable Buildings; • Forming the Federal Green Building Advisory Committee; • Reviewing the latest green building rating standards; • Developing of a research plan for high-performance green building research initiatives and integration with NIST activities; •
Development, review, and analysis of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 and similar high-performance green building standards; • Identifying best practices in operations and maintenance; • Reviewing Federal budget practices impacting green building performance; and • Identifying a demonstration project in a Federal building to promote innovative and emerging green capabilities.
c. Characteristics: The funds provided by the Recovery Act are for the salaries and expenses of the Office. Recovery funds provide for a staff and additional support costs, including travel, training, and supplies. Funds have already been obligated for a contract award to develop a sustainable facilities decision tool for small projects; other funds will be obligated for contracts with academic, research, non-profit, and professional firms that provide services related to high-performance green buildings.
All contracts will be competitively awarded and, to the maximum practicable extent, fixed-price. GSA will follow its standard procurement guidelines and processes including all Government procurement preferences.
d. Delivery Schedule:
(1) Selection of the permanent director for the Office: Complete
(2) Staff selection and hiring: As of May 14, 2010, five employees had been hired into the Office, including a permanent Director; the Office is expected to be fully staffed by August 2010
(3) Review of LEED 2009 – Complete
(4) Select and formalize non-government members of the Federal Green Building Advisory Committee – August 2010
(5) Identification of a demonstration project – Complete
(6) Tracking system for compliance with the Guiding Principles for High-Performance and Sustainable Buildings – Complete
(7) Develop and issue guidance on use of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 in Federal facilities – August 2010
(8) Development of research plan – 3rd quarter 2010
(9) Review and analysis of Federal budget practices impacting green building performance – 2nd quarter 2011
(10) Prepare and submit EISA-mandated biennial report to Congress – June 30, 2010. EISA requires that the report: • Describe the status of compliance with the High-Performance Federal Buildings provisions of EISA and other, related statutes and regulations; • Identify Federal facility procedures that may affect green building certification; • Identify inconsistencies in Federal law that may serve as barriers to implementation of the relevant provisions of EISA; • Recommend language for uniform standards for environmentally responsible acquisition by Federal agencies; • Review the Federal budget process, to identify alternative treatments of energy and environmental costs and benefits; • Identify green, self-sustaining technologies for use in natural disasters and other emergencies; • Summarize and highlight development of high-performance green building initiatives, standards, and laws in State and local governments; and • Make recommendations to address the issues identified in the report, as well as implementation plans for the recommendations.
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e. Environmental Review Compliance: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) – Categorical Exclusion The Recovery Act provides $4 million for salaries and expenses, the collection, analysis and development of standards and practices, coordination and dissemination of information, and program management. GSA does not find this program to be major or significant for the purposes of NEPA reporting.
f. Measures: Following are several quantifiable measures that the office will deliver by the end of 2011. As the Office completes staffing and organizational development, the Director will identify additional performance measures. • Number of agencies with applicable buildings who have been trained on the use of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 for the design of High-Performance Green Buildings: 15 agencies by the end of 2011. • Number of Technology Demonstration Project research reports published: 1 per year, starting June 2011. g. Monitoring/Evaluation: The Recovery Act does not establish any new projects or activities for the Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings. Recovery funds are provided to the Office to carry out the responsibilities established in EISA. As such, the primary process for periodic performance reviews and risk assessments for this program is through the GSA Performance Management Process (PMP). All GSA programs participate in this annual process of developing long- and near-term strategies, allocating resources, managing program performance, and appraising and recognizing individual employee performance. The PMP process is well-designed to identify and mitigate risks and to continuously assess and evaluate the performance of operating programs. h. Transparency: All Federal regulations prepared by the Office will be made available for public comment on http://www.regulations.gov prior to final publication.
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i. Accountability: The Federal Director will submit the EISA-mandated, biennial report to Congress on June 30, 2010. The report will assess the status of compliance with the Federal High-Performance Green Buildings provisions of EISA, including those that establish the responsibilities of the Federal Director. j. Barriers to Effective Implementation: There are no statutory or regulatory requirements that impede effective implementation. k. Federal Infrastructure Investments: No funds were authorized for infrastructure investments.

US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICEAMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLANOFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGSUS GSA Page 1 of 6a. Objectives: Program Purpose: The Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings provides high-performance green building information and disseminates practices, technologies and research results through outreach, education, and the provision of technical assistance government-wide. The Office was established by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (“EISA”, Public Law 110-140) to: (1) coordinate the activities of the Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings with the activities of the DOE Office of Commercial High-Performance Green Buildings; (2) ensure full coordination of high-performance green building information and activities within the General Services Administration and all relevant agencies; (3) establish a senior-level Federal Green Building Advisory Committee, which shall provide advice and recommendations for high-performance green buildings; (4) identify and reassess improved or higher rating standards recommended by the Advisory Committee; (5) ensure full coordination, dissemination of information regarding, and promotion of the results of research and development information relating to Federal high-performance green building initiatives; (6) identify and develop Federal high-performance green building standards for all types of Federal facilities; (7) establish green practices that can be used throughout the life of a Federal facility; (8) review and analyze current Federal budget practices and life-cycle costing issues, and make recommendations to support high-performance green buildings; and (9) identify opportunities to demonstrate innovative and emerging green building technologies and concepts. “High-Performance Green Buildings” are defined as buildings that, as compared to similar buildings: (1) Reduce energy, water, and material resource use;US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICEAMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLANOFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGSUS GSA Page 2 of 6(2) Improve indoor environmental quality, including reducing indoor pollution, improving thermal comfort, and improving lighting and acoustic environments that affect occupant health and productivity; (3) Reduce negative impacts on the environment throughout the life-cycle of the building, including air and water pollution and waste generation; (4) Increase the use of environmentally preferable products, including bio-based, recycled content and nontoxic products with lower life-cycle impacts; (5) Increase reuse and recycling opportunities; (6) Integrate systems in the building; (7) Reduce the environmental and energy impacts of transportation through building location and site design that support a full range of transportation choices for users of the building; and (8) Consider indoor and outdoor effects of the building on human health and the environment, including— (i) Improvements in worker productivity; (ii) The life-cycle impacts of building materials and operations; and (iii) Other, appropriate factors. Public Benefit: This Office supports the stated goals of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act by providing technical standards, measurement tools, and government-wide leadership necessary to support the agencies charged with delivering high-performance green Federal buildings under the Act. The government-wide infrastructure investments supported by the standards and activities of the Office will benefit the public by reducing carbon emissions, reducing consumption of energy and water, increasing reliance on renewable energy in Federal buildings and minimizing related impacts on human health and the environment. b. Activities: The Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings: (1) promotes and coordinates high-performance green building information and activities throughout the Federal government, (2) serves as the Federal government’s green building advocate, and (3) develops standards and green practices for all types of Federal facilities.US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICEAMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLANOFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGSUS GSA Page 3 of 6Current activities of the Office include: • Coordinating activities with the Department of Energy Office of Commercial High-Performance Green Buildings; • Coordinating with the Interagency Sustainability Working Group on the development of a tracking system for compliance with the Guiding Principles for High-Performance and Sustainable Buildings; • Forming the Federal Green Building Advisory Committee; • Reviewing the latest green building rating standards; • Developing of a research plan for high-performance green building research initiatives and integration with NIST activities; • Development, review, and analysis of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 and similar high-performance green building standards; • Identifying best practices in operations and maintenance; • Reviewing Federal budget practices impacting green building performance; and • Identifying a demonstration project in a Federal building to promote innovative and emerging green capabilities. c. Characteristics: The funds provided by the Recovery Act are for the salaries and expenses of the Office. Recovery funds provide for a staff and additional support costs, including travel, training, and supplies. Funds have already been obligated for a contract award to develop a sustainable facilities decision tool for small projects; other funds will be obligated for contracts with academic, research, non-profit, and professional firms that provide services related to high-performance green buildings. All contracts will be competitively awarded and, to the maximum practicable extent, fixed-price. GSA will follow its standard procurement guidelines and processes including all Government procurement preferences.US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICEAMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLANOFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGSUS GSA Page 4 of 6d. Delivery Schedule: (1) Selection of the permanent director for the Office: Complete (2) Staff selection and hiring: As of May 14, 2010, five employees had been hired into the Office, including a permanent Director; the Office is expected to be fully staffed by August 2010 (3) Review of LEED 2009 – Complete (4) Select and formalize non-government members of the Federal Green Building Advisory Committee – August 2010 (5) Identification of a demonstration project – Complete (6) Tracking system for compliance with the Guiding Principles for High-Performance and Sustainable Buildings – Complete (7) Develop and issue guidance on use of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 in Federal facilities – August 2010 (8) Development of research plan – 3rd quarter 2010 (9) Review and analysis of Federal budget practices impacting green building performance – 2nd quarter 2011 (10) Prepare and submit EISA-mandated biennial report to Congress – June 30, 2010. EISA requires that the report: • Describe the status of compliance with the High-Performance Federal Buildings provisions of EISA and other, related statutes and regulations; • Identify Federal facility procedures that may affect green building certification; • Identify inconsistencies in Federal law that may serve as barriers to implementation of the relevant provisions of EISA; • Recommend language for uniform standards for environmentally responsible acquisition by Federal agencies; • Review the Federal budget process, to identify alternative treatments of energy and environmental costs and benefits; • Identify green, self-sustaining technologies for use in natural disasters and other emergencies; • Summarize and highlight development of high-performance green building initiatives, standards, and laws in State and local governments; and • Make recommendations to address the issues identified in the report, as well as implementation plans for the recommendations.US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICEAMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLANOFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGSUS GSA Page 5 of 6e. Environmental Review Compliance: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) – Categorical Exclusion The Recovery Act provides $4 million for salaries and expenses, the collection, analysis and development of standards and practices, coordination and dissemination of information, and program management. GSA does not find this program to be major or significant for the purposes of NEPA reporting. f. Measures: Following are several quantifiable measures that the office will deliver by the end of 2011. As the Office completes staffing and organizational development, the Director will identify additional performance measures. • Number of agencies with applicable buildings who have been trained on the use of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 for the design of High-Performance Green Buildings: 15 agencies by the end of 2011. • Number of Technology Demonstration Project research reports published: 1 per year, starting June 2011. g. Monitoring/Evaluation: The Recovery Act does not establish any new projects or activities for the Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings. Recovery funds are provided to the Office to carry out the responsibilities established in EISA. As such, the primary process for periodic performance reviews and risk assessments for this program is through the GSA Performance Management Process (PMP). All GSA programs participate in this annual process of developing long- and near-term strategies, allocating resources, managing program performance, and appraising and recognizing individual employee performance. The PMP process is well-designed to identify and mitigate risks and to continuously assess and evaluate the performance of operating programs. h. Transparency: All Federal regulations prepared by the Office will be made available for public comment on http://www.regulations.gov prior to final publication.

Page 6 of 6i.

Accountability: The Federal Director will submit the EISA-mandated, biennial report to Congress on June 30, 2010. The report will assess the status of compliance with the Federal High-Performance Green Buildings provisions of EISA, including those that establish the responsibilities of the Federal Director. j. Barriers to Effective Implementation: There are no statutory or regulatory requirements that impede effective implementation. k. Federal Infrastructure Investments: No funds were authorized for infrastructure investments.

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