Job Order Contracting Solutions

OpenJOC Soutions

OpenJOCTM LEAN JOB ORDER CONTRACTING SOLUTIONS

The OpenJOC approach drives maximum productivity by leveraging proven LEAN construction delivery processes.

1. Process – A written Job Order Contract Operations Manual / JOC Execution Guide plays a central role by fully documenting roles, responsibilities, business practices, means, methods, and outcomes.

2. Information – A shared common data environment, CDE, assures a mutual understanding of all project requirements. Industry standards terms and definitions, in plain English, and a standardized, detailed listing of locally researched construction tasks inclusive of labor, material, and equipment costs (organized using CSI MasterFormat).

3. Uses – On-demand renovation, repair, maintenance, sustainability projects and minor new construction are supported within the OpenJOC environment.

4. People – Real property owners and/or facilities management provide leadership, without excessive management and control. All participants contribute to project success within and atmosphere of collaboration, mutual respect, and shared risk/reward.

5. Technology – The role of technology is one of enablement. Cloud technology provides a secure method for all participants to create, view, and share current actionable information. Communications, tasks, and documents are all maintained in a common digital environment.

6. Assessment & Training – Key performance indicators, KPIs, and regular audits, as well as required ongoing training, assure proper JOC Program implementation, management, and continuous improvement.

OpenJOC LEAN JOB ORDER CONTRACTING SOLUTIONS

www.4bt.us

Top 10 Lean Construction Basics

TOP 10 LEAN CONSTRUCTION BASICS

The application of LEAN to construction is a focus upon best value for all project participants.   The core aspects of LEAN have been deployed for decades through collaborative construction delivery methods such as Integrated Project Delivery – IPD (for major new construction) and Job Order Contracting – JOC (for renovation, repair, maintenance, sustainability, and minor new construction).

Core Aspects of LEAN Construction

  1. Collaboration
  2. Best value procurement and execution
  3. Shared risk/reward
  4. Continuous improvement
  5. Key performance indicators – KPIs
  6. Mutual respect
  7. Ongoing education and training
  8. Common terms, definitions, and data architectures
  9. Technology that supports rather than dictates process
  10. Focus upon outcomes

top 10 lean construction delivery basics

LEAN construction requires new ways of interacting on a day to day basis.  For some, the required changes in culture, workflows, and general dynamics are difficult to achieve.

Owners must lead the LEAN construction process and do so without excessive management and control.  In order to lead, however, owners must first grasp and become “LEAN competent”.

The shift to LEAN construction is  virtually required in order to improved productivity, quality and to reduce economic and environment waste.

While some will argue that “Every situation is unique” and there is no standard application of LEAN, core characteristics are and requirements for LEAN do exist.   In short, consistency in process deployment is critical and can easily live within an environment of continuous improvement.  LEAN processes are built to adapt based upon the competency and communication of participants.

A Primer on LEAN Construction Delivery Methods

While LEAN principles, as defined for production systems,  originated from the Japanese manufacturing industry, LEAN construction delivery methods have evolved to meet the requirements of real property owners and the AEC sector.

bim, building information management for FM

Collaborative “LEAN” collaborative construction delivery methods actually predate the term LEAN!

The term LEAN, is was first used by John Krafcik a 1988 article, “Triumph of the Lean Production System.”   Job Order Contracting, JOC, a collaborative “LEAN” construction delivery method was in place prior to 1988.   In fact, JOC was actively being used by 1988, especially by the Department of Defense, and has evolved greatly since that time. Similarly, Integrated Project Delivery, IPD, is also over two decades old.   TPS, the Toyota Production System, which shares some, if not many, aspects with LEAN, evolved initially from 1948 through 1975.

While many view LEAN as a set of tools that assist in the identification and mitigation of waste, its actually a CULTURE, PHILOSOPHY, and COLLABORATIVE BUSINESS PROCESS.  L

LEAN construction delivery is a collaborative business process with ongoing iterative improvement and depends upon the efficient involvement and use of multiple competencies and participants.

LEAN  Construction Delivery Methods share the following characteristics:

  1. Early and ongoing collaboration of participants
  2. Focus upon outcomes
  3. Transparency – financial, planning and technical
  4. Value-based procurement
  5. Continuous monitoring – use of key performance indicators, KPIs
  6. Shared risk/reward
  7. Common terms, definitions, and data architectures
  8. On-demand, On-time, On-budget performance
  9. Meeting establish quality levels
  10. Continuous education, training, and improvement
  11. Long-term relationships of participants and service providers
  12. Waste reduction
  13. Flexibility without excessive management and control
  14. Processes supported by, and embedded within “open” technology

Despite the relatively early beginning and clear value of LEAN Construction Delivery Methods, usage is limited to less than 5% of renovation, repair, and new construction.  The principle reason is lack of competency and leadership of Real Property Owners and general cultural barriers across the AEC industry.  While LEAN Construction Delivery can virtually assure over 90% of projects are delivered on-time, on-budget, and to the satisfaction of all participants and stakeholders, the AEC industry remains mired in wasteful ‘ad-hoc’ practices.

 

Another key aspect of LEAN construction delivery is gathering the right team.  Team members must be capable of planning and executing the right things, at right time,  while maximizing return on investment and minimizing risk.

Flexibility is also important, as it  allows construction related efforts to adapt to changing conditions/influences.   It is the shared competency and expertise of all players, and the standardized information accessible by all, that enables superior outcomes.

All concepts associated with LEAN Construction Delivery must be understood, appreciated, and embraced by all participants…oversight groups, management, service providers, and building users in order to achieve associated value.

The cultural, change management aspects of LEAN are equally important to the processes, tools, and technologies.

The discipline required to implement LEAN Construction Delivery is so counter-cultural to the AEC sector and real property owners, that  successful implementation of lean remains major challenge.

A weak understanding of LEAN Collaborative Construction Delivery Methods will lead to implementations without value and/or sustained benefit.   In fact, some organizations or even some consultants attempt to use and implement LEAN methods such as Integrated Project Delivery (for major new construction) and Job Order Contracting (for renovation, repair, and minor new construction) as a means to simply bypass traditional procurement procedure, as noted by several independent audits of Job Order Contracts over the past several years.

LEAN construction delivery methods and associated processes should be simple to understand, manage, and execute.  An written operation or execution manual, specific to the contract associated with the LEAN construction method (i.e. a Job Order Contract), should clearly specify roles, responsibilities, deliverables, timing, and outcomes.

Owner/service provider communications must be direct, and there must clearly structured methods to prepare and send requests for work, as well as receive responses.

The project pathway, from concept through warranty period  must be simple and direct.

Lean construction delivery methods enable all parties to learn from their experiences.

Fundamental processes associated with Collaborative LEAN Construction Delivery Methods 
  • Senior leadership is in concert with vision and provides authority to appropriate managers and teams.
  • Pilot programs are the first stage in adoption.
  • Objectives are clearly communicated to all participants (internal and external to the organization)
  • Preparation and planning – remove work can be avoided proactively by design.
  • Mitigation of  fluctuation at the scheduling and operations level – clearly follow and/or stay within quality and output levels.
  • Learn from the outcomes of the processes and improve problem areas (transport, inventory, motion, waiting, defects/rework/change orders.
  • Maximized use of skills, competencies, and capabilities through ongoing communication and understanding what needs to be learned.
  • Mutual respect for every stakeholder’s role, problems, and objectives.
  • Team-centric problem solving – developing and engaging people through contribution to team performance.
  • Assured adequate training levels
  • Focus upon outcomes and value-add work
  • Understanding that the role of tools and technology is one of support only.
  • Shared leadership across all operational levels, especially operational team leaders

 

 

The goals of LEAN Collaborative Construction delivery include several possible, if not probable outcomes….

  • Improved quality: Better understanding of client/customer wants, needs, processes, expectations and requirements.
  • Mitigation of waste: Reducing activities that consumes time, resources, or space but do not add any value.
  • Short project delivery times;  Reducing the time it takes to move a project from concept through close out.
  • Reducing total costs: Build exactly what is required, and share cost information throughout the project life-cycle.

 

LEAN – Lessons Learned

  • Keep it simple…
    • Remember that best value outcomes are the goal.
    • Incremental improvements over time.
  • Remember there is always room for improvement.
  • Trust but measure
    • Performance metrics are REQUIRED
    • LEAN construction delivery can not be  successfully implemented without sufficient aptitude at measuring the processes and outcomes. To improve future results requires and understanding of what is happening now.
  • Focus upon communicating and building the CULTURE of LEAN, without undue focus upon tools.  In fact, be wary of elevating tools beyond their designed use.
  • Understand  problems before deciding upon a solution.
  • Decisive leadership is REQUIRED for LEAN implementation
    • The team makes recommendations, leadership determines what recommendations are implemented.

 

10 Steps Toward Real Property Stewardship & Life-cycle Management of the Built Environment

10 Steps Toward Real Property Stewardship

Life-cycle Management of the Built Environment

 

Efficient life-cycle management of the built environment requires ALL of the following. As a  Real Property Owner, how do are you doing?

  1. Collaborative, LEAN business practices and construction project delivery methods (Integrated Project Delivery – IPD, Job Order Contracting – JOC, …)
  2. Metrics including Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)
  3. Continuous education and training
  4. Financial transparency
  5. Common terms, definitions, and standard data architectures
  6. Long-term mutually beneficial relationships with service providers
  7. Life-cycle / Total-cost-of-ownership perspective versus first-cost mentality
  8. Best value procurement
  9. Enabling technology that supports processes/workflows
  10. Focus upon Outcomes

10 steps toward real property stewardship

AEC – Best Value & Operational Excellence

AEC  – Best Value & Operational Excellence

 

As an Owner, Architect, Engineer, Contractor, Building User, or Oversight Group, you can strive for BEST VALUE, OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE, and TRANSPARENCY or maintain ‘status quo’, it’s your choice.

Presuming you want to improve productivity and provide the best possible return on resource expenditure, the first step is to improve your awareness, knowledge, and competency relative to physical asset life-cycle management.

Stop attempting to address problems with TECHNOLOGY, as all you will do is compound existing problems.  Focus upon improving physical asset management competencies, especially the deployment COLLABORATIVE CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY METHODS.

The single most important consideration when attempting to improve quality, delivery times, and lowering expenditures is the CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY METHOD.

It is the CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY METHOD that sets defines roles, responsibilities, levels of risk, business processes and workflows, information standards, timelines, transparency, and collaboration.

It is the CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY METHOD that sets the overall tone for renovation, repair, maintenance, or new construction projects and determines ultimate success or failure more so than any other single element.

Collaborative construction delivery methods have been implemented for decades are a proven to delivery in excess of 90% of projects on-time, on-budget, and to the satisfaction of all participants.  The most notable processes are Integrated Project Delivery, IPD, for major new construction, and Job Order Contracting, JOC for renovation, repair, and minor new construction.

Real property owners must become more knowledgeable in these areas and require collaborative construction delivery methods.   As note, technology, such as 3D BIM, will not solve the woes of the AEC and Facilities Management sectors.  The solution is change-management and improving competency.

Characteristics of LEAN Collaborative Construction Delivery Methods

  • Best Value Procurement
  • Early and Ongoing Collaboration
  • Shared Risk/Reward
  • Common Terms, Definitions, and Data Architectures
  • Financial Transparency
  • Mutual Trust and Respects
  • Focus Upon Outcomes
  • Continuous Improvement, Education, and Training
  • Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

Job Order Contracting

Asset Comptency ModelOpenJOC Detailed Process Diagram

Job order contacting relationship modeljob order contracting value-based

 

Facilities Management in the U.S. – R.I.P.

Facilities Management in the U.S. – R.I.P.

If I see another article about how great facilities management professionals (FMers) are, or how misunderstood, I think my head will explode.

Real property owners, aka FMers, simply aren’t doing their jobs.   It they were, physical infrastructure (buildings, roads, bridges, utilities, ….) deferred maintenance wouldn’t be continuing to climb AND construction would not still be one of the least productive industries of all.

Sure, they are good, if not great FMers, but in general, there is are major professional capability and competency issues.

First and foremost Owner must demonstrate LEADERSHIP throughout all aspects of physical asset life-cycle management.  This means they must understand the concepts of asset life-cycle modeling, LEAN collaborative construction delivery, capital planning and management, total cost of ownership, best value procurement, maintenance strategies, utilization and space planning, physical and functional condition assessment and more…

No one can be an expert in the above competencies, but being able to lead teams of internal and external teams IS a requirement for any FMer with a real property portfolio.

Then, of course, you get the folks that say…”Oh, I can just outsource FM.”   Again my head explodes.   Are facilities and infrastructure core to your organization?   And… you are going to outsource their management?  Really?   Good luck with that.

Here’s a list of topics, areas, in which a real property owner should have a working level of competence.  How do your rate yourself?

  • Outcome-focused planning and management
  • LEAN best management practices
  • Collaborative construction delivery methods (IPD, JOC)
  • Share risk/reward
  • Facility Condition Index
  • Adequacy Index
  • System Condition Index
  • Risk prioritization
  • Financial Transparency
  • Common terms, definitions, data architectures
  • Best value procurement
  • Integral contract execution/operations manuals
  • Mandatory collaboration
  • Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)
  • Performance Audits
  • User & service provider surveys
  • Long term service provider relationships
  • Internal owner cost estimates
  • Plug-in / modular technology
  • Asset modeling

Asset Comptency Model

BIM asset life-cycle competenciesasset life-cycle model for buildings and infrasructure

If you aren’t concerned about FM and AEC service delivery models… you should be.

Owner competency, owner/service provider relationships, and outsourcing trends are alarming at best.

Here’s just a few points to ponder…

  • Owner believe that technology is key to improving the renovation, repair, maintenace, and delivery services and financial transparency.   Well, I have news, if you don’t have sound business process and workflows, not to mention viable strategic and operational plans, technology will just automate you poor practices.
  •  ‘Big data’ and analytics, specifically being able to link data to decision making to improve productivity and service quality is seen as another “game changer”.    Well, two things here.  There IS such a thing as TOO MUCH INFORMATION.   Unless, the information is maintained in standardized formats and in plain english that everyone understands…and its both timely and actionable.   Big data and analytics are worthless.  Again…process and planning MUST come before any attempt to leverage data and/or analytics.
  • Owners are hoping for “culture change” – changing attitudes towards facilities, architecture, construction, and engineering.   They assume changes in the AECOO working/workplace with result  in changes in how people work and communicate – be it through technology or changes to the built environment.   Well, again, newsflash…. Owner MUST DRIVE CHANGE… IT’S UP TO YOU!
  • Increased competition for economic and environmental resources continues… reduced budgets and high expectation of service users are becoming the norm. Despite this obvious trend, real property owners are doing little to change their practices accordingly.
  • Last but not least… and only last, as I am sure you don’t want to read more… it that the trend towards outsourcing continues.  A high percentage of owners outsource more than 50% of their FM services.   Well…. last time I checked, FM is not a commodity, and outsourced service delivery is less efficient than a properly managed owner provided service.    The promises from outsourcing providers of financial savings, better technical expertise, buying efficiencies, and access to management best practices are rarely confirmed… or even measured… and even more rarely fulfilled.  So, again… the rampant trend towards mediocrity, waste, and inefficiency is supported versus mitigated.

Communication, working together as a team and better alignment of strategies and plans are the top areas of focus for most FMers.  However, without proper tools, training, and competencies, most will never achieve measurable positive results.

You don’t believe the situation is dire?

Surveys show that a high percentage of (approximately 50%) Owners don’t feel there is much room for improvement regarding initial request for proposals and briefings, etc.   REALLY?  ARE YOU SERIOUS?

How can that be?   Have they actually read the RFI’s, RFP’s?   Most (60%+) of contractor, engineers, etc. feel their is a LOT of room for improvement relative to Owner RFI’s, RFP’s etc.   This DISCONNECT simply should not exist.    It is another indicator of lack of owner due diligence.

The same percentage hold for questions relative to KPIs, reporting, etc.

What will it take for the U.S. FM and AEC industry to truly adopt innovation and collaborative LEAN business practices?.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BIM, LEAN CONSTRUCTION, & COLLABORATIVE CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY

BIM & LEAN / COLLABORATIVE CONSTRUCTION DELIVERY – If only we could get there!

BEYOND DESIGN, BIM BEGINS WITH 10 STEPS…

  1. Owner competency & leadership
  2. Life-cycle asset management philosophy
  3. Best value procurement
  4. Collaborative construction delivery methods (IPD, JOC, …)
  5. Mutual trust & respect
  6. Common terms, definitions, and data architectures….all in plain English
  7. Shared risk/reward
  8. Monitoring via key performance indicators (KPIs)
  9. Ongoing education, training, & awareness buildling
  10. Continuous improvement

 

 

 

 

 

Building Information Modelling (BIM) is the integration of disparate competencies, business processes, and technologies to accomplish the efficient life-cycle management of the built environment.

Per the above definition, BIM has not moved from theory to reality to any significant extent. Improving facility and infrastructure construction, management, operations, and sustainability is indeed possible, if Owners provide competent leadership.  

Owners must also recognize the value of collaboration, LEAN management methods, and information-based decision-making.   

The fundamental way in which Owners, Architects, Engineers, Contractors, Building Users, and Oversight Groups interact must change.   The issue is not, nor has ever been, shortcomings in technology.  The vacuum is one of lack of change management skills and lack of overall asset life-cycle management competency.

Asset life-cycle management, as demonstrated in the figure below, requires an integration of business areas and competencies.

BIM asset life-cycle competencies

The primary driver is actually the construction delivery method.  It is the construction delivery method that contractually defines roles, responsibilities, timelines, deliverables, relationships, and sets the tone for a project from day one.   The construction delivery method can actually REQUIRE COLLABORATION of all participants, right down to the terms, definitions, and information used.

Thus a collaborative construction delivery CONTRACT and its associated OPERATIONS or EXECUTION MANUAL are the detailed road map to completed a significantly higher percentage (90%+) of quality  renovation, repair, and construction projects on-time and on-budget, and to the satisfaction of ALL participants.

Collaborative construction delivery methods such as Integrated Project Delivery, IPD for major new construction, and Job Order Contracting, JOC, for renovation, repair, maintenance, and minor new construction aren’t new.  The both have proven track records spanning decades.

asset life-cycle model for buildings and infrasructure

OpenJOC win-win

So, why isn’t everyone using collaborative construction delivery methods, and why aren’t 90% of projects delivered on-time and on-budget?   The answer has already been noted… owners are providing the necessary competent leadership, and many players are satisfied with the status quo.

 

 

 

It’s not simply a a learning curve issues,  it’s a culture change.  The multi-party nature, required financial transparency, and sharing of risk and reward is a definite hurdle for many.   Some current owners, contractors, and AE’s, quite simply, won’t be able to make the required transition.

Would it not be nice to stop focusing upon pretty 3D pictures, dated IWMS systems, and other technologies that dictate process and/or embed antagonistic workflows?  As stated previously, technology isn’t the solution, it can however be a crutch, and a problem… if it prevents us from asking the right questions… and dealing with positive change.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Collaborative Construction Delivery = Positive Outcomes

 

The AEC and Facilities Management  industry is fragmented and unproductive.  While many have looked towards technology as the “silver bullet”, software simply can’t correct poor business practices, lack of requisite skills, and an industry resistant to change.

One need to  look no further than the stagnation of BIM in the U.S. and the U.K. to see that software is not the compass that will navigate the AEC and FM sector towards a higher percentage of quality outcomes delivered in a timely manner and on-budget.

The core elements required to drive the AEC and FM sector toward better outcomes are listed below.

  • Elevated Owner Capability & Leadership
  • Best value procurement
  • Collaborative LEAN management practices
  • Common terms, definitions, and data architectures
  • Mutual trust/respect
  • Shared risk/reward
  • Full financial transparency
  • Fully defined and documented roles, responsibilities, deliverables, and processes
  • Continuous education, monitoring, & improvement

 

The causal factors for the AEC/FM sector’s problems include…

  • No common language.
  • Lack of defined and consistently deployed procedures and workflows that benefit all participants
  • Obsolete technology… reliance upon monolithic IWMS and/or BIM systems.
  • Focus upon “the weeds”…   forced levels of rigid detail versus common understanding.
  • Costly, inflexible, and/or untimely revision cycle “standards”..(i.e. “ISO”, “NBIMS” …) versus “open” flexible guidelines and crowd sourced and shared knowledge.
  • No minimum level of competency and lack of proper oversight.

The AEC and FM industry lacks coordination due to void of life-cycle based based goals and objectives and an associated lack of focus upon OUTCOMES.  Owners simply lack the capability, competencies, and/or motivation to engage in leadership.

 

Collaboration, coordination, and improved productivity can only occur within a framework of  goals, competent actors, resources, and activities.  The linkage between the built environment and organizational goals is usually taken for granted or simply not understood, and certainly very rarely proactively managed.

Actors and activities are linked by inter-dependencies which must be formally structured, if not mandated via collaborative construction delivery methods.  strategic facility management and BIMSimilarly competencies in all requisite AEC and FM domains must be required.

Clarity and purpose must be provided by Real Property Owners as well as formal education and ongoing professional training.  While technology has its supporting role, Owner must firmly be in the drivers seat… steering the AEC and FM sectors toward efficient  life-cycle asset management strategies and practices.

Job Order Contracting Education, Training, & Certification

Job Order Contracting Education, Training, & Certification

 

As a LEAN construction delivery methods, Job Order Contracting – JOC, requires continuous education, training, and improvement.  It is important to receive this training and education from professionals with a solid background in asset life-cycle management as well as job order contracting.  This is a limited group of individuals indeed.

OpenJOC win-win

Our team and business partners provide access to this select group of talent.   So, if you have a job order contract and are looking to improve it and/or assure it’s in conformance, or would like to implement or work on a job order contract, give us a call before making any decisions with respect to training, education, or certification.

We are here to help you, and go the extra mile to assure Job Order Contracting is implemented using best management practices.  We are unbiased, objective, and can serve Owners, Contractors, Subcontractors, and Oversight Groups.

We will be happy to tailor a series of courses that progressively cover a range of Job Order Contracting and  Lean Construction topics including:

  • Job  Order Contract Development
  • Job Unit Price Line Estimating
  • Introductory and Advanced
  • How to Develop a JOC Coefficient
  • Job Order Contract Execution / Operations Manual Development
  • Marketing a JOC Program
  • How to Create a JOC RFI/RFP
  • How to Evaluate JOC Contractors
  • Auditing a JOC Program
  • Management by Outcomes
  • Best Value Procurement
  • Owner/Contractor Negotiations
  • How to Create an Owner / Independent Government Estimate
  • Problem-solving principles and Tools
  • Introduction to LEAN Construction Delivery

Courses available on-site or on-line.

Contact – 508.435.3096

 

 

Asset Competency Model – Note 1001

strategic facility management and BIM

Asset Competency Model – Note 1001

FOCUS UPON LEADERSHIP

 

Owners must understand and deploy Asset Competency Models in order to efficiently manage the built environment, or for that matter, even consider full BIM.  The associated minimum levels of education, awareness, and functional competency span multiple relatively complex areas.

While an Owner need not be an expert in all domains, he/she must possess appropriate levels of awareness and be capable of overall LEADERSHIP.

Knowledge Areas and Technical and/or Management Competencies represent the knowledge, skills and abilities needed by Owners ̥ as well as their Teams (in-house as well as service partners such as architects, engineers, contractors, business product manufactures, etc.) .

At a  high level, Process Improvement, Execution, Planning, Scheduling Control ̥ Lean management ̥ Sustainability ̥  and Enabling Technology Application are fundamental skills Real Property Owners must develop.

These in turn, drill down to the next levels such as… Procurement/Purchasing  and Scheduling Techniques ̥  Conceptual Planning and Design, Renovation/Repair/Maintenance, Construction Project Delivery, Supplier/Service Provider Relationship Management, and Operations Management.

At the very core, Real Property Owners must understand all management activities carried out in the course of linking the physical and functional conditions and availability buildings to the organizations core mission.

Leading, monitoring, adjusting, organizing and planning are just the start.  Being able to explain the implications implications various facility management strategies in simple terms to senior management/oversight groups is vital.

The ability demonstrate the sensitivity of outcomes to multiple independent variables is nontrivial… especially in terms that an equally diverse audience can appreciate.

Once resources are obtained and suitable service partners selected, the process of leveraging efficient execution and ongoing improvement through the use of LEAN Best Management Practices and Collaborative Construction Delivery Methods... can begin.

Quite simply, real property owners and facility managers need to spend more time developing LEADERSHIP skills.

WORKPLACE AND LEADERSHIP COMPETENCIES represent those skills and abilities that allow individuals to function in an organizational setting. Problem solving and decision making, goal-directed thinking and actions, understanding problems through their step-by-step analysis and  and reasoning.   =

Owners need to map processes and focus on importance of individual factors as needed in order to achieve BEST VALUE.

COLLABORATION AND TEAMWORK provides the ability to accomplish the above. Owners and FMers must demonstrate commitment to developing and LEVERAGING internal and external team energy and expertise to achieve a common objective. ̥

Understanding the dynamics of effective teamwork in order to attain higher levels of performance is perhaps the single most important aspect of LEADERSHIP.  The process can be greatly aided, and accelerated by learning about and deploying already establish and proven LEAN construction delivery methods.  For example,  the successful deployment of integrated project delivery (IPD) and/or Job Order Contracting (JOC) within an organization, readily demonstrates the value and the ability to work as part of a tight-knit and competent group of entities and people.

Asset Comptency Model

Job order contacting relationship model

job order contracting