Why Revit is NOT BIM !

If you think Revit is BIM, please stop now.

Revit is a BIM tool, as are similar products from Graphisoft, Bentley Systems, etc. etc.  These tools provide the basic 3d design/rendering/engineering components of BIM (and, yes I know, some additional functionality) and associated object technologies. 

BIM on the other hand is a business process enabling cradle-to-grave life-cycle management of the built environment supported by a variety of techologies, of which Revit is  just “one”.

Those who have spent ten to thirty plus years in the AEC sector know how much a  laggard our industry is versus others when it comes to efficient business processes and supporting technologies.  As a result, the adoption of BIM will REQUIRE fundamental “cultural changes” in AEC business practices.  The basic business foundations of the AEC community must adapt to enable BIM and it’s resulted added value to flourish.

Sure, the risks that come with change are ever present, however, the reward, a productive AEC industry, will benefit everyone… owners, users/occupants, contractors, architects, engineers, software providers, business product manufactuers, and the community at large.

BIM Deployment Plan from Revit / Autodesk

BIM Strategy

The Autodesk BIM Deployment Plan – tools and guidance for building industry professionals interested in implementing Building Information Modeling (BIM) – is a reasonable framework for those beginning to investigate BIM, however, it lacks requisite depth relative to 4d, 5d BIM as well as contruction delivery methodology.  

A comprehensive BIM strategy from an owner perspective (and, in my opinion contractor and A/E’s as well as other stakeholders), should include capital planning and management (lifecycle costing, capital renewal, physical/functional conditions management), operations and maintenance (repair, maintenance, minor renovations-preventive, routine, maintenace), space planning/management, and integration of efficient construction devlivery methodsy (JOC – Job Order Contracting for facility repair/maintenance, IPD – Integrated Project Delivery for new construction, etc.), and associated reference cost data, standard definitions/metrics/taxonomy, ….

Tools offered in the Autodesk BIM deploym,ent plan are intended to provide a practical framework for AEC stakeholders, and can be used by individual organizations on specific projects. The BIM Deployment Plan includes:

  • BIM support materials for owners, architects, engineers, and contractors
  • Templates to streamline multi-discipline communications
  • Recommendations for roles and responsibilities
  • Best business process examples
  • Software suggestions for an effective BIM environment

BIM_Deployment_Plan_Final

Definitions of Terms Used in This Document
 

As-Built Model Model

—The final model that shows how a building was actually delivered and assembled. Sometimes referred to as the Record Model.

Building Information Modeling (BIM)—An integrated process aimed at providing coordinated, reliable information about a building project throughout different project phases—from design through construction and into operations.  BIM gives architects, engineers, builders, and owners a clear overall vision of the project—to help them make better decisions faster, improve quality, and increase profitability of the project. 
 
Clash Detection — The process of checking for clashes and interferences in the design of one or more BIM models.

 

Collaborative Project Management — A software solution that enables effective management of and collaboration on all project related communication, information, and business processes across the plan, build, and operate phases of the building lifecycle. The most common processes include collaborative documentation, design, bid, construction, cost, and operations management.  (Examples of software include www.4clicks.com Project Estimator for JOC construction delivery).     Coordination Model—A model created from two or more models, used to show the relationship of multiple building disciplines such as architectural, civil, structural, and MEP (mechanical, electrical, and plumbing).

Core Collaboration Team —The group of people – which should include someone from each party working on the project, such as the owner, architect, contractor, subconsultants, suppliers, and trade contractors—responsible for completing a BIM Deployment Plan, creating the document management file folder structure and permission levels in the collaborative project management system, and enforcing the action plan set out in that document throughout design and construction of the project.
Design Intent Model —The model used to communicate the design intent of a building.
Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) —A neutral and open file format structure developed by the International Alliance for Interoperability (IAI) to enable interoperability between modeling software systems.
Integrated Project Delivery (IPD)—A project delivery process (similar to JOC for facility repair, renovation, and sustainabilty)  that integrates people, systems, business structures, and practices to collaboratively harness the talents and insights of all participants in order to optimize project results, increase value to the owner, reduce waste, and maximize efficiency throughout all phases of design, fabrication, and construction (AIA,  Integrated Project Delivery: A Guide , 2007, available at http://www.aia.org/ipdg).
Model Integrator—A tool used to combine and/or link design files from different software platforms.
Model Manager(s)—The project team member(s) responsible for managing the collaboration and sharing of electronic files during the project. Model managers are also responsible for maintaining the integrity of BIM models, which can include gathering, linking, and uploading updated models.
Parametric —The relationships among and between all elements of a model that enable coordination and change management. These relationships are created either automatically by the software or manually by users as they work.
Project System Administrator (PSA) —The person who administers, and sets up folders for, the collaborative project management system. Responsible for managing and creating new user accounts, as well as contact and company information. 

OFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGS

US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICE
AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLAN
OFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGS
US GSA
via http://www.4clicks.com – construction cost estimating and project management software for JOC – SABER – SATOC – MATOC – MACC – BOA – POCA – IDIQ
Page 1 of 6
a. Objectives: Program Purpose: The Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings provides high-performance green building information and disseminates practices, technologies and research results through outreach, education, and the provision of technical assistance government-wide. The Office was established by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (“EISA”, Public Law 110-140) to:
(1) coordinate the activities of the Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings with the activities of the DOE Office of Commercial High-Performance Green Buildings;
(2) ensure full coordination of high-performance green building information and activities within the General Services Administration and all relevant agencies;
(3) establish a senior-level Federal Green Building Advisory Committee, which shall provide advice and recommendations for high-performance green buildings;
(4) identify and reassess improved or higher rating standards recommended by the Advisory Committee;
(5) ensure full coordination, dissemination of information regarding, and promotion of the results of research and development information relating to Federal high-performance green building initiatives;
(6) identify and develop Federal high-performance green building standards for all types of Federal facilities;
(7) establish green practices that can be used throughout the life of a Federal facility;
(8) review and analyze current Federal budget practices and life-cycle costing issues, and make recommendations to support high-performance green buildings; and
(9) identify opportunities to demonstrate innovative and emerging green building technologies and concepts.
“High-Performance Green Buildings” are defined as buildings that, as compared to similar buildings: (1) Reduce energy, water, and material resource use;
Page 2 of 6
(2) Improve indoor environmental quality, including reducing indoor pollution, improving thermal comfort, and improving lighting and acoustic environments that affect occupant health and productivity; (3) Reduce negative impacts on the environment throughout the life-cycle of the building, including air and water pollution and waste generation;
(4) Increase the use of environmentally preferable products, including bio-based, recycled content and nontoxic products with lower life-cycle impacts;
(5) Increase reuse and recycling opportunities;
(6) Integrate systems in the building;
(7) Reduce the environmental and energy impacts of transportation through building location and site design that support a full range of transportation choices for users of the building; and
(8) Consider indoor and outdoor effects of the building on human health and the environment, including—
(i) Improvements in worker productivity;
(ii) The life-cycle impacts of building materials and operations; and
(iii) Other, appropriate factors.
Public Benefit: This Office supports the stated goals of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act by providing technical standards, measurement tools, and government-wide leadership necessary to support the agencies charged with delivering high-performance green Federal buildings under the Act.
The government-wide infrastructure investments supported by the standards and activities of the Office will benefit the public by reducing carbon emissions, reducing consumption of energy and water, increasing reliance on renewable energy in Federal buildings and minimizing related impacts on human health and the environment.
b. Activities: The Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings: (1) promotes and coordinates high-performance green building information and activities throughout the Federal government,
(2) serves as the Federal government’s green building advocate, and (3) develops standards and green practices for all types of Federal facilities.
\
Current activities of the Office include: • Coordinating activities with the Department of Energy Office of Commercial High-Performance Green Buildings; • Coordinating with the Interagency Sustainability Working Group on the development of a tracking system for compliance with the Guiding Principles for High-Performance and Sustainable Buildings; • Forming the Federal Green Building Advisory Committee; • Reviewing the latest green building rating standards; • Developing of a research plan for high-performance green building research initiatives and integration with NIST activities; •
Development, review, and analysis of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 and similar high-performance green building standards; • Identifying best practices in operations and maintenance; • Reviewing Federal budget practices impacting green building performance; and • Identifying a demonstration project in a Federal building to promote innovative and emerging green capabilities.
c. Characteristics: The funds provided by the Recovery Act are for the salaries and expenses of the Office. Recovery funds provide for a staff and additional support costs, including travel, training, and supplies. Funds have already been obligated for a contract award to develop a sustainable facilities decision tool for small projects; other funds will be obligated for contracts with academic, research, non-profit, and professional firms that provide services related to high-performance green buildings.
All contracts will be competitively awarded and, to the maximum practicable extent, fixed-price. GSA will follow its standard procurement guidelines and processes including all Government procurement preferences.
d. Delivery Schedule:
(1) Selection of the permanent director for the Office: Complete
(2) Staff selection and hiring: As of May 14, 2010, five employees had been hired into the Office, including a permanent Director; the Office is expected to be fully staffed by August 2010
(3) Review of LEED 2009 – Complete
(4) Select and formalize non-government members of the Federal Green Building Advisory Committee – August 2010
(5) Identification of a demonstration project – Complete
(6) Tracking system for compliance with the Guiding Principles for High-Performance and Sustainable Buildings – Complete
(7) Develop and issue guidance on use of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 in Federal facilities – August 2010
(8) Development of research plan – 3rd quarter 2010
(9) Review and analysis of Federal budget practices impacting green building performance – 2nd quarter 2011
(10) Prepare and submit EISA-mandated biennial report to Congress – June 30, 2010. EISA requires that the report: • Describe the status of compliance with the High-Performance Federal Buildings provisions of EISA and other, related statutes and regulations; • Identify Federal facility procedures that may affect green building certification; • Identify inconsistencies in Federal law that may serve as barriers to implementation of the relevant provisions of EISA; • Recommend language for uniform standards for environmentally responsible acquisition by Federal agencies; • Review the Federal budget process, to identify alternative treatments of energy and environmental costs and benefits; • Identify green, self-sustaining technologies for use in natural disasters and other emergencies; • Summarize and highlight development of high-performance green building initiatives, standards, and laws in State and local governments; and • Make recommendations to address the issues identified in the report, as well as implementation plans for the recommendations.
Page 5 of 6
e. Environmental Review Compliance: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) – Categorical Exclusion The Recovery Act provides $4 million for salaries and expenses, the collection, analysis and development of standards and practices, coordination and dissemination of information, and program management. GSA does not find this program to be major or significant for the purposes of NEPA reporting.
f. Measures: Following are several quantifiable measures that the office will deliver by the end of 2011. As the Office completes staffing and organizational development, the Director will identify additional performance measures. • Number of agencies with applicable buildings who have been trained on the use of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 for the design of High-Performance Green Buildings: 15 agencies by the end of 2011. • Number of Technology Demonstration Project research reports published: 1 per year, starting June 2011. g. Monitoring/Evaluation: The Recovery Act does not establish any new projects or activities for the Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings. Recovery funds are provided to the Office to carry out the responsibilities established in EISA. As such, the primary process for periodic performance reviews and risk assessments for this program is through the GSA Performance Management Process (PMP). All GSA programs participate in this annual process of developing long- and near-term strategies, allocating resources, managing program performance, and appraising and recognizing individual employee performance. The PMP process is well-designed to identify and mitigate risks and to continuously assess and evaluate the performance of operating programs. h. Transparency: All Federal regulations prepared by the Office will be made available for public comment on http://www.regulations.gov prior to final publication.
Page 6 of 6
i. Accountability: The Federal Director will submit the EISA-mandated, biennial report to Congress on June 30, 2010. The report will assess the status of compliance with the Federal High-Performance Green Buildings provisions of EISA, including those that establish the responsibilities of the Federal Director. j. Barriers to Effective Implementation: There are no statutory or regulatory requirements that impede effective implementation. k. Federal Infrastructure Investments: No funds were authorized for infrastructure investments.

US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICEAMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLANOFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGSUS GSA Page 1 of 6a. Objectives: Program Purpose: The Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings provides high-performance green building information and disseminates practices, technologies and research results through outreach, education, and the provision of technical assistance government-wide. The Office was established by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (“EISA”, Public Law 110-140) to: (1) coordinate the activities of the Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings with the activities of the DOE Office of Commercial High-Performance Green Buildings; (2) ensure full coordination of high-performance green building information and activities within the General Services Administration and all relevant agencies; (3) establish a senior-level Federal Green Building Advisory Committee, which shall provide advice and recommendations for high-performance green buildings; (4) identify and reassess improved or higher rating standards recommended by the Advisory Committee; (5) ensure full coordination, dissemination of information regarding, and promotion of the results of research and development information relating to Federal high-performance green building initiatives; (6) identify and develop Federal high-performance green building standards for all types of Federal facilities; (7) establish green practices that can be used throughout the life of a Federal facility; (8) review and analyze current Federal budget practices and life-cycle costing issues, and make recommendations to support high-performance green buildings; and (9) identify opportunities to demonstrate innovative and emerging green building technologies and concepts. “High-Performance Green Buildings” are defined as buildings that, as compared to similar buildings: (1) Reduce energy, water, and material resource use;US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICEAMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLANOFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGSUS GSA Page 2 of 6(2) Improve indoor environmental quality, including reducing indoor pollution, improving thermal comfort, and improving lighting and acoustic environments that affect occupant health and productivity; (3) Reduce negative impacts on the environment throughout the life-cycle of the building, including air and water pollution and waste generation; (4) Increase the use of environmentally preferable products, including bio-based, recycled content and nontoxic products with lower life-cycle impacts; (5) Increase reuse and recycling opportunities; (6) Integrate systems in the building; (7) Reduce the environmental and energy impacts of transportation through building location and site design that support a full range of transportation choices for users of the building; and (8) Consider indoor and outdoor effects of the building on human health and the environment, including— (i) Improvements in worker productivity; (ii) The life-cycle impacts of building materials and operations; and (iii) Other, appropriate factors. Public Benefit: This Office supports the stated goals of the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act by providing technical standards, measurement tools, and government-wide leadership necessary to support the agencies charged with delivering high-performance green Federal buildings under the Act. The government-wide infrastructure investments supported by the standards and activities of the Office will benefit the public by reducing carbon emissions, reducing consumption of energy and water, increasing reliance on renewable energy in Federal buildings and minimizing related impacts on human health and the environment. b. Activities: The Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings: (1) promotes and coordinates high-performance green building information and activities throughout the Federal government, (2) serves as the Federal government’s green building advocate, and (3) develops standards and green practices for all types of Federal facilities.US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICEAMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLANOFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGSUS GSA Page 3 of 6Current activities of the Office include: • Coordinating activities with the Department of Energy Office of Commercial High-Performance Green Buildings; • Coordinating with the Interagency Sustainability Working Group on the development of a tracking system for compliance with the Guiding Principles for High-Performance and Sustainable Buildings; • Forming the Federal Green Building Advisory Committee; • Reviewing the latest green building rating standards; • Developing of a research plan for high-performance green building research initiatives and integration with NIST activities; • Development, review, and analysis of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 and similar high-performance green building standards; • Identifying best practices in operations and maintenance; • Reviewing Federal budget practices impacting green building performance; and • Identifying a demonstration project in a Federal building to promote innovative and emerging green capabilities. c. Characteristics: The funds provided by the Recovery Act are for the salaries and expenses of the Office. Recovery funds provide for a staff and additional support costs, including travel, training, and supplies. Funds have already been obligated for a contract award to develop a sustainable facilities decision tool for small projects; other funds will be obligated for contracts with academic, research, non-profit, and professional firms that provide services related to high-performance green buildings. All contracts will be competitively awarded and, to the maximum practicable extent, fixed-price. GSA will follow its standard procurement guidelines and processes including all Government procurement preferences.US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICEAMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLANOFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGSUS GSA Page 4 of 6d. Delivery Schedule: (1) Selection of the permanent director for the Office: Complete (2) Staff selection and hiring: As of May 14, 2010, five employees had been hired into the Office, including a permanent Director; the Office is expected to be fully staffed by August 2010 (3) Review of LEED 2009 – Complete (4) Select and formalize non-government members of the Federal Green Building Advisory Committee – August 2010 (5) Identification of a demonstration project – Complete (6) Tracking system for compliance with the Guiding Principles for High-Performance and Sustainable Buildings – Complete (7) Develop and issue guidance on use of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 in Federal facilities – August 2010 (8) Development of research plan – 3rd quarter 2010 (9) Review and analysis of Federal budget practices impacting green building performance – 2nd quarter 2011 (10) Prepare and submit EISA-mandated biennial report to Congress – June 30, 2010. EISA requires that the report: • Describe the status of compliance with the High-Performance Federal Buildings provisions of EISA and other, related statutes and regulations; • Identify Federal facility procedures that may affect green building certification; • Identify inconsistencies in Federal law that may serve as barriers to implementation of the relevant provisions of EISA; • Recommend language for uniform standards for environmentally responsible acquisition by Federal agencies; • Review the Federal budget process, to identify alternative treatments of energy and environmental costs and benefits; • Identify green, self-sustaining technologies for use in natural disasters and other emergencies; • Summarize and highlight development of high-performance green building initiatives, standards, and laws in State and local governments; and • Make recommendations to address the issues identified in the report, as well as implementation plans for the recommendations.US GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION—PUBLIC BUILDINGS SERVICEAMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT PROGRAM PLANOFFICE OF FEDERAL HIGH PERFORMANCE GREEN BUILDINGSUS GSA Page 5 of 6e. Environmental Review Compliance: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) – Categorical Exclusion The Recovery Act provides $4 million for salaries and expenses, the collection, analysis and development of standards and practices, coordination and dissemination of information, and program management. GSA does not find this program to be major or significant for the purposes of NEPA reporting. f. Measures: Following are several quantifiable measures that the office will deliver by the end of 2011. As the Office completes staffing and organizational development, the Director will identify additional performance measures. • Number of agencies with applicable buildings who have been trained on the use of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 for the design of High-Performance Green Buildings: 15 agencies by the end of 2011. • Number of Technology Demonstration Project research reports published: 1 per year, starting June 2011. g. Monitoring/Evaluation: The Recovery Act does not establish any new projects or activities for the Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings. Recovery funds are provided to the Office to carry out the responsibilities established in EISA. As such, the primary process for periodic performance reviews and risk assessments for this program is through the GSA Performance Management Process (PMP). All GSA programs participate in this annual process of developing long- and near-term strategies, allocating resources, managing program performance, and appraising and recognizing individual employee performance. The PMP process is well-designed to identify and mitigate risks and to continuously assess and evaluate the performance of operating programs. h. Transparency: All Federal regulations prepared by the Office will be made available for public comment on http://www.regulations.gov prior to final publication.

Page 6 of 6i.

Accountability: The Federal Director will submit the EISA-mandated, biennial report to Congress on June 30, 2010. The report will assess the status of compliance with the Federal High-Performance Green Buildings provisions of EISA, including those that establish the responsibilities of the Federal Director. j. Barriers to Effective Implementation: There are no statutory or regulatory requirements that impede effective implementation. k. Federal Infrastructure Investments: No funds were authorized for infrastructure investments.

Facility Operations and Maintenance Audits

Is your organization following industry “best practices”?    A operations and maintenance audit my save your firm 15% in energy related costs, and improve  both systems reliablity and “client” satisfaction.

 

Faclities Stewardship
Faclities Stewardship

High Performance Buildings Research and Analytics for Competitive Advantage in HEALTHCARE  

Sustainability and High Building Performance for Existing Hospitals – Hospitals account for a disproportionate percentage of energy consumption, representing a significant opportunity to lower operating costs and minimize carbon footprint.   Drawing upon our nationwide databases and decades of experience, RS Means engineers and analysts off a perspective driven by the power of data mining, predictive analytics, and decades of real world experience.

 

RS Means Operations & Maintenance Audits – Recognizing the disparate needs of healthcare institutions, we offer multiple service levels to help focus resources upon facility operation best practices and projects to optimize building performance and reduce energy impacts.  Our experienced teams can help to identify underperforming structures within your portfolio, and/or building systems within a single hospital.  Traditional approaches have not leveraged standardized cost databases, nationwide data mining, and research analytics to normalize varied content and enforce quality standards, thus lacking the ability to inventory and benchmark, conduct year-over-year analysis, create prioritized project lists, and predict ongoing system requirements.                                                                                                                                                                                                    

Level I—Our collaborative, customized process begins by gathering critical building, system and equipment level information via a “smart survey” questionnaire-based approach. Service efficiency is directly related to highly organized and focused maintenance activities.  By comparing the survey to our knowledge of industry best practices the Level I analysis provide a relative benchmark and associated score on an overall basis and within specifically defined subcategories.                                                                                                                                                                                            

Level II—In addition to a smart survey, Level II involved a site visit by RS Means team members.  During the visit, we will have an opportunity to review on-site documentation as well as view major building systems.  The Level II analysis yields specific, prioritized recommendations for cost savings opportunities.   Deliverables include a critical equipment inventory with associated recommendations spanning operational changes, automated controls, and engineered changes.                                                                                                                                    

Level III— Level III delivers all aspects of the prior stages, plus implementation assistance in the form of a document noting prioritized projects, associated cost and scheduling estimates.  Recommendations are targeted to move existing facilities toward reaching and maintaining a lower carbon diet.

 

  • Critical equipment list
  • Operational changes
  • Automated controls
  • Engineered systems changes

 

Additional Services:

Life Cycle Cost Studies—Our data shows that in 2007, green products entered the construction specifications market at a 22% adoption rate. Life-cycle cost savings are a distinct market advantage for green building products. RSMeans engineers conduct studies can that benchmark present net values and ROI for existing hospitals; multi-year capital renewal, maintenance, and janitorial costs. Customized, robust building cost models, built from RSMeans Square Foot, and Assemblies (Uniformat II) databases, are used for the analysis.

Market Segmentation Analysis—Analysis from actual hospital construction projects as well as geographic market segment (e.g., national, state, MSA).  Market penetrations for building product markets, such as “green products” are calculated for micro market analyses.  Material usage, a significant metric for the analysis, is determined from the “percent of spend” of CSI divisions regarding building materials represented in RSMeans square foot models.

Statistical analysis of Reed Connect “plans and specifications” database identifies architectural influences within contract documents. Studies analyze product adoption for trends as well as competitive analysis. The analysis is available as an executive summary report (e.g. regions, states and vertical markets) or as web-based decision support dashboard.

Market Size & Market Opportunity Dashboards—Multiple drill down layers of analyses provide a quantitative market overview. Dashboard data feeds and analyses include RCD/Means proprietary data, client data, and publicly available data to address questions about market size and growth potential of healthcare construction as well as renovation markets.

 

 

For more information contact RSMeans Business Solutions at 781-422-5101
or email consulting@rsmeans.com